An Interview With Hip Hop Artist Vincent Cruz Montano

vince

 

 

Vincent Cruz Montano is a hip hop artist; here is a link to his YouTube page:

 

Q: What made you interested in music?

 

A: Music has always been a delivery of validation. Remembering back to the first song I enjoyed as a kid was by a female artist named Paula Abdul called Rush, Rush. Other than having an early spark toward the music my parents were listening to, I have also enjoyed listening to all kinds throughout my years into adulthood. Not until I started making music did I feel an inner spike which has me by the heart. It’s like being an artist helped my appreciation and feeling of content towards nowadays artist which assist me in catching their drift.

 

Q: What sets you apart from other hip hop artist?

 

A: Every artist whether Country or Hip Hop has their one percent illustrated through craft. Nothing specifically sets me apart though I can only surmise a few differences that might be substantial. For example, my song called “Donkey Kong Beat” took me about three to four weeks to get it sounding the way it does. If I did have to site something specific, it would be the one percent statement in other words. I try my best to have multiple one percent’s isolated from one another vs. one percent’s that coat tail from radio format. Not that there is anything wrong with coat tailing. My preference is to only practice that formation based on your own signature for development and growth.

 

Q:  Who are some of your musical influences and how is that evidenced in your music?

 

A: Tom Petty, Third Eye Blind, and Cyndi Lauper to name a few of my most liked besides Chvrches. Specifically Tom Petti in a song I use the lyric “Last name Jane first Marry what’s the chance?” Listening to Out Of The Vein by Third Eye Blind, upon recently graduating Burlingame high school, was I very pleased and subtly influence towards the concept of lyric being personal and containing memento vibe. Cyndi Lauper blows my mind with a few of her songs. “Money Changes Everthing” makes me consider the dedication and obligation of and to being a Star boy.

 

Q: What is the most innovative thing you have done to promote yourself?

 

A: Other than almost buying in bulk customized thumb drives, I have collaborations with a few rappers that have seemed to reflect the level of energy on target for radiation. Also, I once did a radio show though I am not sure how many people were able to listen. I have preferred to stay low key with my music. I also got propositioned to play my song at a club for a c-note by Ric Lee. Though I declined and used that payment toward another track. He gave me a heads up I wasn’t ready for. Getting your music out there takes a lot of resources.

 

Q: What trends in music annoy you?

 

A: No specific trends annoy me enough to call them out at face value. Irritation occurs when fifty one percent of the song is about you and what you think vs. know. Figuring something out was the most exciting thing that artist usually do as they start out. Then either you stick to that through mimicking, which works for some. Or you reach outside your comfort zone and make some songs with a message people can learn from through applying to themselves.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have?

 

A: I work at a Homeless Shelter. Due to importance of school having illustrated itself at this point, I plan on going back to school once it starts up again. I also have a moving job that occurs between two and three times a month. Though my moving job pays healthier than my job at the shelter, I feel that my shelter job gets me use to my fall back area of focus should music never find me. At least I can share with people starting today till my last. Being able to share music at work has been successful so far. I have a few new fans.

 

 

Q: How do your experiences at your day job influences your writing?

 

A: Nodaway I find myself writing poetry. Sharing with those around me has had its moments.

Being able to hang around with individuals with a wonder wall has its perks and moments of reality check. Engaging in conversations enables the message and energy to illustrate validation uncontested. Whether or not someone can change post a single conversation is debatable. However I find myself changing after simple interactions and quality of bounce back pertaining to respect. Listening to the way some are closed vs. being open has me very validated and content with my line of work. This holiday season allows for friendly suggestions being at least considered. Such as, just a phone call sends a message of love regardless of circumstance when you are just checking in for holiday wishes.

 

 

Q: What kind of themes do you like to explore in your music?

 

A: The theme of metaphors is fun to explore. Something to be taken away from the experience with aims to captivate. Being able to deliver a theme that tries to float as universal is a go to for me and music.

 

Q: What inspired the song Tropical Shawdy?

 

A: My First real girlfriend took me on vacation to Hawaii for the first time I had even been. I had the best time of my life through exploring what a real vacation feels like. Upon coming home, I was asked by a friend to make a second trip in the near future at that time. I invited my gf to come along though I did make the mistake of informing her that it was an all guys trip. But asking my friend if she could go, he responded with an of course. The flight time was only days away when he informed me that two of his gf’s would be attending to make the trip more affordable and to have some wing ladies. She found out and was not too happy.

 

Q: What is your theme song and why?

 

A: The “Donkey Kong Beat” is only rivaled by one other for top spot in area of theme song. I say this because the DK project took me several weeks to make acceptable. I have a number of rough drafts that needed to be combed over till it sounds the way it does. Not only the time but the energy and effort happened to go into it has a message about direction for The Vandals. My family helped me out with this song by providing their dedication as well. Though I know for a fact that I was a nuisance to Scandal for how many time I asked him to work on this project. He would always ask “why are you still working on the same song for such a long time?” Maybe eight years in the future you will have a worthy answer I would tell him.

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

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