Month: August 2017

An Interview with Aspiring Actor Ravi Petchetti

rav
Ravi Petchetti is an aspiring actor and IT specialist; here is a link to his YouTube page:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W44zpdPLWsQ

 

Q:  What made you interested in acting?

 

A: I always wanted to act and be in front of the camera. Acting gives me a real high since it allows me to portray different characters, go through various emotions, simulate varied setting which otherwise in real life you might not get a chance to do.

 

Q:     What kind of training have you had?

 

A: I have not had any formal training, I guess I am a natural 😊 I got briefly trained in JAZZ dance but that’s about it. All my learning has been on the sets.

 

Q:     You work in IT. How does your day job prepare you for the job of acting?

 

A: It doesn’t much except that the fact that we all pretend we know what the other guy is talking about in the meetings (though we really don’t ). Also aren’t we all actors in real life?

 

Q:    What is 71 Feet Diner about?

 

A: Actually ’71 Feet Diner’ is the working title, the actual short film name is ‘Nameless’ (Yes, isn’t that ironic?). It is about a lost guy trying to find the meaning of life. In pursuit of that – he roams around, meets different people from various walks of life and shares life experiences with them

 

Q:      What role do you play?

 

A: I play a role of a Pakistani bartender dealing with his own issues of life. As a part of the interaction with the main lead, he vents out his frustrations on him but later realizes his mistake due to his other good friends’ words of wisdom

 

Q: What experiences did you draw from when playing the role?

 

A: I could empathize with the role and understand the emotions the character was going through. We all have to go through the daily grind of life and in the process face various hurdles, frustrations but eventually learn to move on with life in the best possible way

 

Q: What would you do if you disagreed with a director about the way a character should be played?

 

A: I would be open and discuss with the director but finally go with what he says because I believe Director is truly the captain of the ship and ultimately it is his vision. A true actor needs to mold himself to that vision and be an enabler in fulfilling that vision.

 

Q:  What famous film role could you have nailed?

 

 A: I believe I am good at subtle acting and with everyday humor.  I am a huge fan of Seinfeld and I would love to reprise his role if it was rebooted again. Also I am a big fan of Robert De Niro and would love to do his role in Midnight Run

 

Q: What makes someone a bad actor?

 

A: I guess as soon as the audience loses interest in you. Actor’s job is to hold the audience attention and make them travel along with you without losing the interest.

 

Q: What one thing would you most like to change about the film industry?

 

A: I think I am too inexperienced, young to answer that question, I am just getting my feet wet in this industry. Maybe after 10 years, when I am enough experienced and successful, I will be able to answer this better 😊

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

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An Interview With Photographer Cendrine Marrouat

 

Cendrine LinkedIn profile (1)

 

 

Cendrine Marrouat is a photographer, here is a link to her website:

 

http://creativeramblings.com/

 

Q: What made you interested in photography?

A: The desire to document the things around me.

 

I started my artistic career as a poet, and like every writer will tell you, it can be hard to find the words to describe concepts.

 

Originally, though, I did not believe I had any talent as a photographer. For a very long time, I did not even know what I was doing. But people’s encouraging words did the trick. In 2014, after four years of practice and self-education, I started selling my photos online. A year later, my first photography book was out.

 

Q: Why black and white?

A: There is something very special about it. I am like a child in a candy store when I see tintypes and daguerreotypes. Early photography fascinates me.

 

Working with the black-and-white format is a fulfilling and liberating experience. It is like trying to re-create the past out of the present. I’m not sure if it makes sense.

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we see them in your work?

A: Ansel Adams is the photographer who has had the most impact on my work. While I am not a big fan of over-processing photos, I love contrast.

 

As to how people can see Adams’ influence in my photos, I can’t really say. I will let others decide for themselves. 😉

 

Q: What is the overall theme of ‘Life’s Little Things: The Quotes’?

A: I have noticed that an increasing number of people resort to negativity to get attention these days. Facebook, in particular, has become a hotbed of verbal aggression.

 

People need to treat themselves better if they want respect from others. But it will not happen until they understand the importance of self-awareness.

 

‘Life’s Little Things: The Quotes’ leverages this idea. I have paired my own images with words of wisdom (based on personal experience) to encourage the viewer to reconnect with themselves.

 

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when they first attempt nature photography?

 

A: Most people go directly for the obvious — the thing that is directly in front of them. They do not take the time to build stories into their shots.

 

For example, when taking a photo of a landscape, check if there are clouds. Blue sky is nice but can be quite boring. Clouds add great texture and drama.

 

Macros are not interesting if you just stand on top of your subjects. It has just been done too many times. Look around you and take advantage of your surroundings. Take a vertical shot, for example.

 

Aim for the geometry in nature, look at the way light hits tree barks or leaves, and use the rule of thirds to create dynamics.

 

Good photography is like theatre or a traditional haiku. It forces us to rethink our pre-conceived notions of the world.

 

Q: What is the most challenging photograph you have ever taken?

A: This one: https://fineartamerica.com/featured/droplets-2-cendrine-marrouat.html. (The black-and-white version can be found here: https://fineartamerica.com/featured/droplets-3-cendrine-marrouat.html.)

 

I took the photo a few years ago in my backyard just after a rain spell. Everything was against me. The ground was muddy. The wind was blowing quite hard. And my tripod was too tall. I had to actually hand-hold the camera and twist my body not to move too much!

 

I cannot remember how long it took me to take the shot, but my legs hurt for a long time after the session. Lol

 

Q: How does your job as a language teacher influence your ability to pursue your photography projects?

 

A: Studying the way language works has many benefits. For example, you develop strong analytical skills and an ability to read between the lines. Through my 14 years as a French instructor to adults, I have also learnt flexibility and how to ensure that the learning experience is fun and enriching for my students.

 

Every time I am in the classroom, I feel excited and alive. I know I will learn almost as much  from my students as they will learn from me. I keep that open mind with photography and always experience the same kind of emotions.

 

Q: What makes something a worthwhile focal point for a nature photograph?

A: The little details that make the overall picture enticing.

Q; What are do you consider to be something in nature that has been over-photographed? What has been under examined?

 

A: Honestly, I don’t think you can over-photograph anything in nature. It all depends on your relationship with your surroundings and the way you use them to tell your stories.

 

I have been taking shots of the same spots for years. But each photo is different or unique. The light will never hit in the same exact spot. The wind may have moved things around. Somebody may have left their mark, etc. I just love challenging myself to catch those differences.

 

What has been under examined, though, is the impact of details on the resulting images. Nature is not just about gorgeous landscapes and flowers.

 

Great photography seeks the mundane to capture the fleeting, but true beauty of life in its many forms.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview With Self-Help Author Ms. Joe Bacon

mjb

Ms. Joe Bacon is the author of 30 Things That Scare Women About Themselves! Here is a link to the books Amazon page:

https://goo.gl/at202K

 

Q: What inspired you to write, 30 Things That Scare Women About Themselves!

 

A:  I was inspired by the conversations that continued to surround me by women. I was constantly thinking oh they are like me or it is always someone in worse off shape so be grateful and see the positive in life.

 

Q:  What qualifies you to write a self-help book?

 

A: I think anyone who pays attention to life can write a self help book, especially with so many air heads walking around staring in the clouds or their smart devices. They do tend to make people dumber.

 

Q: What kind of research did you do for the book?

 

A: At first, I didn’t know that this book would develop, but in trying to write another book, I started to look at all of the topics, saw the potential & began to interview women from all walks of life.

 

Q: What are a few examples of the kind of things that scare women about themselves?

 

A: Having your child molested and not know how to help them thru it. Finding out your spouse cheated on you. Having your child hate you. Failing at your goals. being confused about your sexuality.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your writing?

 

A: I manage the office of a tech company in San Francisco, CA. & flip houses in the US.

 

Q: What are some self help books that have helped you?

 

A: Rich Dad Poor Dad, The Secret, and almost any book by Tony Robbins. I love him.

 

Q: What have you done to promote your book?

 

A: Interviews, social media, and beating the pavement so I can speak to people.

 

Q: What other kinds of writing do you do?

 

A:  Real life issues like PPD , abuse, or family issues.

 

Q: How can you tell a good self-help book from a bad one?

 

A:  I feel that every book is different, so if it helps you then it is a good book for you.

 

Q: What scares you about yourself?

 

A:  I am scared of failure and having my child not like me. I didn’t like my bio-logical mom and I fear that will happen with my son and I. I find myself trying to exceed with what ever he wants or needs of me. We have a great relationship now and I hope it doesnt change.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.