Month: November 2018

An Interview With Singer Clayton Morgan

Clayton Morgan - Front pic

 

Clayton Morgan is a singer and songwriter who recently released the album “Taste for Love”; here is a link to his website: 

Q: When did you know you were a musician?

 

A: I knew I wanted to be a singer from early childhood. My earliest memories of performing date back to preschool.
Q: What themes do you like to explore in your music? 

 

A: I like to explore themes of love and happiness in my music. I am a person that loves love and it’s a universal theme that transcends all cultures and backgrounds. Love is a message that creates a common bond between people.

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we hear this in your music?

 

A:  My biggest influences are Michael and Janet Jackson. I especially like the way Janet’s music makes me feel. Most of her music is upbeat and happy. Those are qualities that I like to put in my music. I want the music to be upbeat and happy. I want my music to make people happy when they hear it.

 

Q: What kind of day job (or income source) do you have and how does it influence your music?

 

A: I currently work a 9 to 5 in the Banking industry. Right now, my 9 to 5 pays the bills. It also helps me create the music that I make.

 

Q: What is the most effective thing you have done to promote your music?

 

A: The most effective thing I’ve done to promote the music is work with Michael Stover at MTS Management. Michael has been very instrumental in the success of my career. I can’t thank him enough for all his hard work and dedication!

 

Q: What is the worst advice anyone has ever given you about your musical career?

 

A: Performing live is an important part of connecting with the fans and building a following for what you do as a musician. Every artist is different regarding the types of gigs they choose to perform. I don’t think it’s in my best interest to perform at any gig dropped in my lap. I like to decide what the live performance opportunity will be and what feels right for me.

 

Q: What kind of training have you had?

 

A: I’ve had vocal training. I’m also working on dance training.

 

Q: Your father is Eddie Daniels. What did you learn about the music industry from him?

 

A: My dad’s time in the music industry ended shortly before I was born. I only heard stories about his time in the industry. He told me to watch people around you, meaning management wise. The music group he was part of had shady management. That was one of the main reasons he left the group.

 

Q: What inspired “Taste for Love?”

 

A:  Taste for Love was inspired by the instrumental track. Once I heard the track, the lyrics came to me instantly. It’s a sensual song about wanting to be with that special person.

Q:  What are you working on now?

 

A: My latest single ‘The Beat is Calling Me’ was released on November 12, 2018. I’m in the process of working on the live show set. There will be live performances coming up in early 2019.

 

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

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An Interview With Author Mitchell Thompson

mtt

 

Mitchell Thompson is the author of “Introspective Rationale: The Odyssey of Theodicy; here is a link to his website:

 

 

https://www.irot.me

 

Q: What is “Introspective Rationale.”  about?

 

A: Introspective Rationale is a nonfiction historical narrative that journeys the reader on a quest in understanding the deeper connection between major worldly religions and their historical context. These intimate connections, once revealed, display certain commonalities in both ethics and ideology. Such ideological parallels can be further understood in their application within modern science and mathematics – namely quantum mechanics. For example, there exists many numerological significance in ancient scripture; numbers of meaning that translate within modern fields of scientific study. One must first understand the history of both religion and science before gaining a deeper insight on their dualistic partnership.

 

Q: What made you want to write a book about individual subjectivity versus the objectivity of the universe?

 

A: For much of our lives, societal individuals are plagued with a yearning for instant gratification. Before I began writing my book, I was helping my mother take care of her bed-ridden father who was dying of dementia. This man, though my grandfather, was estranged to me and my family. He had not approved of my mother marrying a man of color. In taking care of him, we inevitably grew to bond. It was during this bonding that I began to realize how my subjective perception of our relationship (or lack thereof) was irrelevant in the face of our objective kinship. I began to notice certain traits of myself within him – even at the height of his dementia. I had never had a grandfather; for my Dad’s father had passed before I was born. However, the wisdom I learned from my estranged grandfather granted me new insight within the nature of myself. This experience inspired me to write about the concept of dissolving the ego: to differentiate the importance of both individual objectivity and subjectivity.

 

Q: What kind of educational background do you have?

 

A: I went to public school, and finished in the top percent of my high school class. Upon graduating, I began to attend a prestigious college in William Jewell College where I sought to triple major in Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics. Because I attained many college credit hours in high school, I developed a keen understanding for higher level mathematics and dimensional reasoning as only a college freshman. As it pertains to writing, I have always loved doing so but more as a hobby. I took many advanced placement literature classes in high school, as well as college English, so my informal writing has some formal foundations.

 

Q: What kind of research did you do for your book?

 

A: Comparing and contrasting hours of work in studying between my own research in writing IROT and that of obtaining a doctorate in philosophy:

 

Undergrad

120 credit hours required

16 week semester

15 credit hours per semester

30 hours of work a week (6 hours a day)

16 x 30 = 480 hours of work per semester

8 semesters of schooling (BA/BS)

8 x 480 = 3,840 hours of total work

2 years of Masters (MA)

15 credit hours

30 hours of work a week (6 hours a day)

4 semesters of schooling

4 x 480 = 1920 hours of work total

(1920 + 3840 = 5,760 hours of total work between BA/BS and MA)

PhD

120 credit hours (generally required)

16 week semester

15 credit hours a week

30 hours of work a week (6 hours a day)

16 x 30 = 480 hours of work per semester

8 semesters of schooling (PhD)

8 x 480 = 3,840 hours of work total

3,840 + 5,760 = 9,600 hours of total work to obtain PhD

 

Research/writing for IROT

41 months total

14 months of stagnant

27 months “hardcore”

14 months of stagnant

4 hours a day (maximum)

5 days a week

20 hours of work a week

14 months = 61 weeks

61 x 20 = 1,220 hours of total stagnant work

27 months “hardcore

“Hardcore”: 12 hours a day, 6 day’s a week (minimum), 72 hours a week

12 hours of work a day

6 days a week

72 hours of work a week

27 months =  117 weeks of hardcore work

117 x 72 = 8,424 hours of “hardcore” work

41 months total

1,220 + 8,424 = 9,644 total hours of work for writing IROT

 
Q: How would you define elevated consciousness?

 

A: Elevated consciousness is the state of being that exists ahead of the ego. When one dissolves the ego, they are able to attain an elevated state of awareness. A conscientious state that can differentiate between objective requirements and subjective desirements.

 

Q: How does one attain this consciousness?

 

A: One attains elevated consciousness by dissolving the ego. The ego is the subjective sense of self. In rationalizing the introspective process, one is able to step away from the ego’s deceptive perception and see reality in an objective light.

 

Q: What is the most successful thing you have done to promote your book?

 

A: I have made both a website and a Facebook author profile page.

 

https://www.facebook.com/mitchellgthompson

 

https://www.irot.me

 

 

Q: What kind of a day job do you have and how does it influence your writing?

 

A: I work two jobs: a morning gig and an afternoon gig. The morning job is at a supply warehouse, while the afternoon job is as a kickboxing instructor. The morning job forces me to wake up at 4 AM everyday, which gives me the discipline needed to write on days I don’t feel like writing. The kickboxing instructor position has allowed me to work with a myriad of different people – allowing me insight into many minds of varying beliefs. Such insight influences the way I write in appealing to a general audience.

 

Q: What philosophers have had the most influence on your work?

 

A: I know very little on many different philosophers. I am a master of some and an expert of none. However, of all that I’ve adopted from, Friedrich Nietzsche and Baruch Spinoza were perhaps the most influential.

 

Q: If you could elevate the consciousness of any famous person, who would it be and why?

 

A: Hmm… perhaps Kanye West. Mainly because he seems to have the right idea in certain ideals, but is lost in translating most of his thoughts through an egocentric lens of insanity. Most people of social and monetary affluence attain such fame due to their evolving of the ego rather than dissolving.

 

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)