Tag: best of wordpress

An Interview With Photographer Cendrine Marrouat

 

Cendrine LinkedIn profile (1)

 

 

Cendrine Marrouat is a photographer, here is a link to her website:

 

http://creativeramblings.com/

 

Q: What made you interested in photography?

A: The desire to document the things around me.

 

I started my artistic career as a poet, and like every writer will tell you, it can be hard to find the words to describe concepts.

 

Originally, though, I did not believe I had any talent as a photographer. For a very long time, I did not even know what I was doing. But people’s encouraging words did the trick. In 2014, after four years of practice and self-education, I started selling my photos online. A year later, my first photography book was out.

 

Q: Why black and white?

A: There is something very special about it. I am like a child in a candy store when I see tintypes and daguerreotypes. Early photography fascinates me.

 

Working with the black-and-white format is a fulfilling and liberating experience. It is like trying to re-create the past out of the present. I’m not sure if it makes sense.

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we see them in your work?

A: Ansel Adams is the photographer who has had the most impact on my work. While I am not a big fan of over-processing photos, I love contrast.

 

As to how people can see Adams’ influence in my photos, I can’t really say. I will let others decide for themselves. 😉

 

Q: What is the overall theme of ‘Life’s Little Things: The Quotes’?

A: I have noticed that an increasing number of people resort to negativity to get attention these days. Facebook, in particular, has become a hotbed of verbal aggression.

 

People need to treat themselves better if they want respect from others. But it will not happen until they understand the importance of self-awareness.

 

‘Life’s Little Things: The Quotes’ leverages this idea. I have paired my own images with words of wisdom (based on personal experience) to encourage the viewer to reconnect with themselves.

 

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when they first attempt nature photography?

 

A: Most people go directly for the obvious — the thing that is directly in front of them. They do not take the time to build stories into their shots.

 

For example, when taking a photo of a landscape, check if there are clouds. Blue sky is nice but can be quite boring. Clouds add great texture and drama.

 

Macros are not interesting if you just stand on top of your subjects. It has just been done too many times. Look around you and take advantage of your surroundings. Take a vertical shot, for example.

 

Aim for the geometry in nature, look at the way light hits tree barks or leaves, and use the rule of thirds to create dynamics.

 

Good photography is like theatre or a traditional haiku. It forces us to rethink our pre-conceived notions of the world.

 

Q: What is the most challenging photograph you have ever taken?

A: This one: https://fineartamerica.com/featured/droplets-2-cendrine-marrouat.html. (The black-and-white version can be found here: https://fineartamerica.com/featured/droplets-3-cendrine-marrouat.html.)

 

I took the photo a few years ago in my backyard just after a rain spell. Everything was against me. The ground was muddy. The wind was blowing quite hard. And my tripod was too tall. I had to actually hand-hold the camera and twist my body not to move too much!

 

I cannot remember how long it took me to take the shot, but my legs hurt for a long time after the session. Lol

 

Q: How does your job as a language teacher influence your ability to pursue your photography projects?

 

A: Studying the way language works has many benefits. For example, you develop strong analytical skills and an ability to read between the lines. Through my 14 years as a French instructor to adults, I have also learnt flexibility and how to ensure that the learning experience is fun and enriching for my students.

 

Every time I am in the classroom, I feel excited and alive. I know I will learn almost as much  from my students as they will learn from me. I keep that open mind with photography and always experience the same kind of emotions.

 

Q: What makes something a worthwhile focal point for a nature photograph?

A: The little details that make the overall picture enticing.

Q; What are do you consider to be something in nature that has been over-photographed? What has been under examined?

 

A: Honestly, I don’t think you can over-photograph anything in nature. It all depends on your relationship with your surroundings and the way you use them to tell your stories.

 

I have been taking shots of the same spots for years. But each photo is different or unique. The light will never hit in the same exact spot. The wind may have moved things around. Somebody may have left their mark, etc. I just love challenging myself to catch those differences.

 

What has been under examined, though, is the impact of details on the resulting images. Nature is not just about gorgeous landscapes and flowers.

 

Great photography seeks the mundane to capture the fleeting, but true beauty of life in its many forms.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview With Self-Help Author Ms. Joe Bacon

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Ms. Joe Bacon is the author of 30 Things That Scare Women About Themselves! Here is a link to the books Amazon page:

https://goo.gl/at202K

 

Q: What inspired you to write, 30 Things That Scare Women About Themselves!

 

A:  I was inspired by the conversations that continued to surround me by women. I was constantly thinking oh they are like me or it is always someone in worse off shape so be grateful and see the positive in life.

 

Q:  What qualifies you to write a self-help book?

 

A: I think anyone who pays attention to life can write a self help book, especially with so many air heads walking around staring in the clouds or their smart devices. They do tend to make people dumber.

 

Q: What kind of research did you do for the book?

 

A: At first, I didn’t know that this book would develop, but in trying to write another book, I started to look at all of the topics, saw the potential & began to interview women from all walks of life.

 

Q: What are a few examples of the kind of things that scare women about themselves?

 

A: Having your child molested and not know how to help them thru it. Finding out your spouse cheated on you. Having your child hate you. Failing at your goals. being confused about your sexuality.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your writing?

 

A: I manage the office of a tech company in San Francisco, CA. & flip houses in the US.

 

Q: What are some self help books that have helped you?

 

A: Rich Dad Poor Dad, The Secret, and almost any book by Tony Robbins. I love him.

 

Q: What have you done to promote your book?

 

A: Interviews, social media, and beating the pavement so I can speak to people.

 

Q: What other kinds of writing do you do?

 

A:  Real life issues like PPD , abuse, or family issues.

 

Q: How can you tell a good self-help book from a bad one?

 

A:  I feel that every book is different, so if it helps you then it is a good book for you.

 

Q: What scares you about yourself?

 

A:  I am scared of failure and having my child not like me. I didn’t like my bio-logical mom and I fear that will happen with my son and I. I find myself trying to exceed with what ever he wants or needs of me. We have a great relationship now and I hope it doesnt change.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

An Interview With Jukebox Film Festival Director Darla Bayer

 

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Darla Bayer is the Director of The Jukebox International Film Festival; here is a link to their website:

https://filmfreeway.com/festival/JukeboxInternationalFilmFestival

 

Q: What made you interested in starting a film festival?

A: It all started when I discovered the 48 Hour Film Project. I wanted to do one myself so I started a free group to help find filmmakers willing to compete. I called the monthly meeting “Wired Wednesday”. We taught each other, crewed for each other and even participated in The No Film Film Fest.

It became evident that we were not going to do a 48 Hour film, as they were all too far for us to journey, so instead I suggested we start a competition called “City Wide Short Film Competition”.

This competition was modeled on the 48 hour except it was a one week time frame, from Wednesday to Wednesday to get the film written, cast, shot, edited and back to us. All teams were to use the same three prompts, a specific sound effect, a specific line of dialog and a specific prop. They had their choice of 6 genres to chose from. It was a blast! And the films were remarkable!

City Wide is now in it’s 6th year and has a spin off called “Carson Creepy Horror Film Competition”. This one came about because I had refused to let horror be a genre in City Wide, trying to keep it more family oriented. Well, a few filmmakers convinced me and we have had some truly awesome films come out of that competition as well.

Ok…rolling right along, we’ve done the competition thing. Wired Wednesday knows how to do this now, so why not a festival?

Q: What makes your film festival unique?

 

A: We like the basis of our festival because it is all about music. We accept music videos, documentaries and feature films. An added bonus is our screening dates are during an established music festival, Jazz and Beyond.
Being a musician and a filmmaker myself, I enjoy seeing documentaries about musicians or styles.

Q: What can your film festival offer that others cannot?

 

A: The fact this festival is smack dab in the middle of a live music festival. With musicians all over town in multiple venues. Free concerts mostly.

 

Q:  How did you obtain funding for the festival?

 

A: Past competitions have brought in money from advertisers. That’s pretty much it.

Q: Who will judge the contest?

 

A: We have industry professionals, writers, directors, musicians. Some not yet confirmed, but, Joseph Bly, Celtic musician, director Brian Nunes, Rita Geil, Lacy J Dalton.

Q: What advice would you give to a potential entrant?

 

A: Please be sure your film is music themed, we expect more than just music in the background. The film should play on specific stories about musicians, venues, styles. Singer songwriter moves up in the world, that sort of thing. Music videos of course can tell the story of the songs lyrics, those will be more interesting than just watching a band play their song, although we are not opposed to that either. Music, music, music.

Q:  What kind of day job do you have and how does it affect your ability to organize a film festival?

 

A: I am a freelance  costumer and do video production (camera to edits). My last job however was running a public access tv station. We had a studio where people could check out cameras and learn all needed to create film and tv.

Q: What is the best musical film you have ever seen?

 

A: A few years ago a friend of my daughters had a film he had just completed called “Find Your Way”. A documentary about buskers. We screened the film thru our Wired Wednesday group, open to the public followed by a skype with the director. That film, not only for the technical aspects which were very good, touched me on a level that made me very happy. To see musicians out there doing their thing and being appreciated. Another film that I love is Oingo Boingo‘s “Hot Tomorrows”, obscure, yes, but truly memorable film noir in black and white. I’d be willing to say that film was what made me want to make films myself

Q: What is the worst musical film you have ever seen?

 

A:  I don’t really have a worst, I’ve liked nearly all I have seen. I enjoy musical theatre as well and enjoy seeing the filmed productions. Some of my best memories are from my high school years when Mrs.Morrow, our drama teacher, introduced us to shows like Studs Terkel’s “Working” and “Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris”. Those films were inspirational to my entire life.
 

Q:  What living musician’s life do you think has been over documented?

 

A: I don’t feel there is an over documented issue. The more out there the more we have an effect on people. So if there’s a film about, say, Paul McCartney, and yet there’s been others, those who want to see them all can. But someone who knows nothing about him, only one of the films might look interesting enough for them to view. It’s not a competition between films. They play on each other, build and grow interest.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview with Jordan Casty of Eleven Dollar Bills

 kyle

Jordan Casty is the lead singer for the band Eleven Dollar Bills; here is a link to the band’s first album:

All Our People

 

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a musician?

 

A: I’ve been singing and messing around on instruments for as long as I can remember but something strange happened when I was sixteen and I found out just the slightest bit of music theory.  I felt like I was stepping into a different world and speaking the same, mysterious language all my musical heroes were speaking.  I felt like I had joined a new club and I never wanted to leave.

 

 

Q: What is your creative process?

 

A: My creative process starts with drinking a whole bunch of coffee and messing around with my guitar or piano.  I feel around in the dark, humming melodies and fiddling on the guitar until something sounds like the beginning of a real idea.  Some melody that feels sturdy enough to build on or some group of words that sparks a song idea.  It’s just a construction job from there.  That’s how our new single ‘Waves’ came about.  Some mumble sounded like the key to a joyful idea about serious fun.  A couple hours later we’d fashioned up a whole new chapter of our musical lives.

 

Q: What is the overall theme of your album, All Our People?

 

A: The All Our People EP is about bringing people together through celebration of life.  It’s about amplifying experience across the entire spectrum of emotion so that life becomes a deeper and more exciting ride.

 

Q: Did Bob Dylan inspire your name or is there another meaning behind it?

 

A: Bob Dylan has been my favorite songwriter since I started diving deeply into his work during my college years.  I felt like if I named my band after one of his lyrics, I might be able to direct a bit of whatever spirit has been speaking through him to come through me for a while.

 

Q:  How did you and the other band members get together in the first place?

 

A: This incarnation of the band came together in Los Angeles and we all met through playing music in the bars out here.  There are so many places to see killer live music in LA and when I got out here, I just started talking with everybody I thought was great after they got off stage.  We’d jam and play some trial-shows together and then it congealed into the lineup you see today.

 

Q:  What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your music?

 

A: I drive a bit of Uber when the music money is slow.  I like to talk with my passengers if it feels like they’re open to it.  I feel like it helps in my songwriting to get so many different people’s stories.  The more varied your perspective, the more powerfully you can write.

 

Q: Your recording is very professional sounding! How did you get the album financed?

 

A: Thank you for the kind words!  Our producer Jim Huff is indeed a master craftsman.  And a master with the budget!  He called in a lot of favors to get this record made and we had a bit of family funding for whatever we weren’t able to cover ourselves.

 

 

Q: What would you change about the music industry?

 

A: If I could change one thing about the music industry, it’d be updating the royalty rates for songwriters.  Songwriters are really getting shafted lately and it’d be nice to see the money split up more fairly.

 

Q: What is your weirdest LA story?

 

A: One of my weirdest LA stories came while driving Uber.  I picked up this guy who told me to “just drive”.  I said okay and when I looked over, he was ‘making it rain’ on Tinder.  That’s when you rapidly and indiscriminately swipe right to rack up a swath of matches.  He kept it up and I kept driving through Los Angeles until he’d found a match that met his criteria.  He must’ve been a pro sweet talker because he had her address in minutes and we headed that way.  I pulled up and he went in.  But not before asking if I’d like to join.  I told him I’d have to take a rain check.

 

Q: At which club do you most look forward to having a concert?

 

A: Since I grew up in Chicago, playing the main stage at Lollapalooza will be a pretty serious thrill.  But the Hollywood Bowl might be even more fun.

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

An Interview With Artist Natalie Krystine

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Natalie Krystine is an artist; here is a link to her website:

www.nataliekrystine.com

 

Q:  When did you know you were an artist?

 

A: I honestly think that it wasn’t until about two years ago that I started thinking of myself as an artist.

But I’ve probably always been an artist. When I look back, art has always been a constant in my life. My mom used to do finger painting projects with me when I was a baby. And I began wanting to do my own artwork at about two years old. I wasn’t a child prodigy, so none of it was any good. My dad is actually really talented at drawing and would give me short art lessons as a child. My mom was more into crafts. She was always crafting or making something. Their interests in arts and crafts, paired with their constant encouragement, really helped me to pursue many different artistic endeavors over the years. I appreciate so many things because of them, and want to try so many different avenues of art. This is probably why it’s taken so long for me to adopt the label of “artist”.

 

Q: Who are some of your artistic influences?

 

A: I would have to say that I’ve been inspired by Diane Arbus, Frida Kahlo, Wayne Thiebaud, Ray Johnson, and David Hockney. I also really love Marcel Duchamp because he put a urinal in a museum. In general, I’m really inspired by artists that don’t sell out and just do the art they want to do. I think that there is a lot of bravery in expressing a part of you that may come off as weird to someone looking in.

 

Q: What do you hope to communicate through your art work?

 

A: If I’m doing commissioned artwork, I just try my best to communicate what I’ve been asked to do.

But when I get to do my own artwork, I find myself trying to express the nostalgia I feel about things, that are honestly, extremely normal and boring. In my general life, I tend to become interested in things that were small footnotes of an experience. The tiny details help me remember a bigger memory or emotion. It’s like a bookmark for me. I also feel color is extremely important to how I express my work. I find myself trying to mix colors until it matches the subject matter on an emotional and visually appealing level. I hope that other people enjoy my work and are able to project their own life experiences onto my pieces.

I also really want people to find humor in my projects. Most of my projects start off with me thinking something would be funny or ridiculous to make. If an idea doesn’t make me laugh or smile, I generally don’t pursue it further.

 

Q:  What made you choose acrylics?

A: I’ve only been painting with acrylics for about three years now. I was kind of bored one summer day, and remembered I had a box of acrylics at home. I’ve never taken painting lessons. But I knew acrylic paint is generally pretty easy to work with. I wanted to paint a very large portrait of my dog to the best of my abilities. I thought it would be funny to give it to my parents as a present. A month later, it was finished. My parents loved it. My mom put a gold, ornate frame around it and hung it up in the hallway. Other people saw it and started hiring me to paint their pets. Because of all this, I realized I really liked using acrylics. And I got a lot of practice from the commissions.

 

Q:  What kind of day job do you have and how does it affect your work?

 

A: I work in an office as an inside salesperson. It’s a really normal Monday through Friday job. It allows me evenings and weekends to work on projects.

 

Q: What happens at one of your painting parties?

 

A: I come to your house with painting supplies and a project for all of us to do together. I stand in front of everyone and demonstrate the steps that we need to do in order to complete the project. Everyone gets to wear an apron. I also wear an apron. But mine is green with strawberry pockets, which indicates that I am the instructor. I walk around and help anyone that needs assistance. Sometimes people eat snacks and play music. I’ve mostly been hired to instruct children.

Being an art teacher was one of my first art-related dreams! I’m really happy that I get to experience that dream from time to time.

 

Q: One of the services you offer is “Bad Portraits,” how do you go about making them intentionally bad?

 

A: It has to be bad, but not so bad that you can’t recognize the subject of the portrait. I actually pay attention to what the person looks like. But I leave out most of the details. I think what helps this project is that I hate pencils. I only draw with pens.

I do want to add, that in addition to my dad giving me basic drawing lessons while growing up, I actually did take drawing classes in college. But… My drawing abilities have always been really mediocre. The “Bad Portraits” project is my way of poking fun at that and embracing my subpar abilities.

Q: What do you like about the San Francisco art scene?

A: It’s nice that it feels very open and welcoming. I’m actually really shy about sharing my art with other people, especially face-to-face. But any time I’ve done an art event in San Francisco, my nerves have been eased by how nice everyone is!

Q: What about it would you change?

 

A: I wish I was more involved in it. I’m trying to change that!

Q:  If you could do an acrylic painting of a famous person’s soul, who would you pick and what would it look like?

A: When I really think about it, I’m not incredibly creative nor inventive, so I’d probably just paint a portrait of an obscure Bay Area celebrity, like Jan Wahl, or someone from a commercial that I think is funny. I feel like I wouldn’t know much about them either… So I’d just paint the background with a really vibrant color that I like and be done with it.

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview With Actress Katherine Roberts

kr

Originally posted on Act.Land.

 

Katherine Roberts is an actress who appears in the film Assassin’s Apprentice; here is a link to her IMDB Page:

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6199153/

 

 

Q:  What is the Assassin’s Apprentice about?

 

A: The Assassin’s Apprentice is about an assassin Pete, played by Robert Picardo who trains his apprentice Kaylee, played by Tarah Page. The film follows her training and ultimately one last test which she decides to do her own way.

 

Q: What role do you play?

 

A: I play Tiffany, a woman on a date with a mob boss who witnesses a surprising scene while at the bar with Pete and Kaylee. (I don’t want to give too much away!)

 

Q: What did you do to prepare for the role?

 

A:  I watched Scarface and studied Michelle Pfeiffer’s performance. I also talked with the director and producers on what they expected from Tiffany’s character, then rehearsed with my scene partners.

 

Q: What is the biggest difference between you and the character of Tiffany?

 

A: Well, I am definitely not as forward. I am a very friendly person, but Tiffany is a man eater!

 

Q: What made you interested in acting?

 

A:  I have always been intersted in acting, ever since I was young girl. I guess my affinity started when my parents would take me to the local theatre and I was amazed by the beauty and sadness storytelling could convey. I knew I wanted to be a story teller too.

 

Q: What is your strangest audition story?

 

A: I audition a lot for Latin American parts, which is great since I am mostly of Peruvian and Spanish decent, however I am not a native Spanish speaker, only conversational. I had to say a few lines in Spanish, which I did fine, but then was thrown a curve ball and had to talk in English with a Spanish accent, a la Sofia Vergara-let’s just say whatever what was coming out of my mouth sounded a mix between Italian and an accent you have never heard of. I was horriffied, as I’m sure the casting director was too. Let’s just say I didn’t book the job!

 

Q: What kind of day job or income source do you have and how does it affect your pursuit of acting?

 

A:  I make most of my money from commercials and print modeling. I have wonderful agents and work pretty consistantly. Keep an eye out for me in Wells Fargo’s nationwide. Also, on the side I like to dog sit and dog walk my neighbor’s dogs. I am a huge animal lover. I also am developing an app, and freelance write. I try to stay on top of everything and I like to think of myself as a go getter, so whatever I set my sights to I commit myself 100%

 

Q:  Have you ever had a disagreement with a director about how a role should be played? How did you deal with it?

 

A: No never. I value the director’s vision on every and all projects I have ever worked on. Even if I saw my character in another way, I always listen and take in whatever the director sees. Ultimately, I trust the director to guide the actors to their best performances

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Q: What famous role could you have nailed and why?

 

A:  I am currently watching Girlboss on Netflix, and I know I could have killed the main role of Sophia. I was living in San Francisco during the time NastyGal took off and was born and raised in the Bay Area. I love playing characters with quirky relatability and I definitely could have brought that. However, I love Britt Robertson’s take on the character and am a big fan of the show.

 

Q: What is the most realistic movie you have ever seen about Los Angeles?

 

A: I’m not sure about movie, but the episode of Sex in The City where the girls visit Los Angeles is pretty spot on! The healthy eating, meetings, premiere’s, and just overall LA vibe is pretty realistic; and hilarious.

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

An interview With Rapper Hiiigh Quality

Hiiighquality is a rapper who recently released the EP, PSA’s and Heartbreak; here is a link to his Soundcloud page:

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Q: What made you interested in music?

 

A: What made me interested in music was basically the surroundings growing up, hearing it, experiencing & relating to it then I also saw some of my older friends tapping into it.

 

Q:  What kinds of things inspire you to rap?

 

A: The kinds of things that inspire me to rap are original, amazing lyricists, & looking at all the things Ive been through & overcame because of the most highs within me.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it affect your music?

 

A:  I actually have errand running and home cleaning gigs I participate in weekly, & it effects my music in a pretty positive way, as far as motivation.

 

Q: What kind of formal training have you had?

 

A: I haven’t had any formal training.

 

 

Q: Who are some of your influences?

 

 

A: Some of my influences are John Lennon, Bob Marley, Damien Marley,Steve Jobs, Ice Cube, Snoop dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Vince Staples, Ab-Soul, Mac Miller, A$AP Rocky etc.

 

Q: Where do you record your music?

 

A: . I record my music inside of my home at the moment.

 

Q: What is Hydro about?

 

A: Hydro is basically kind of an alter ego, or nickname because lots of people call me that.

 

Q: What is the one thing you would change about the music industry?

 

A: The one thing I would change about the music industry is the evil actions.

 

Q: What have you done to promote your music?

 

A:  Ive strictly promoted online on social media, & also outside on the streets as well.

 

 

Q: If you could write a rap musical, what would the plot be?

 

 

A: If I could write a rap musical the plot would probably be A Kid trapped in his city with a vision, battling everyday obstacles who soon finds that life is much more bigger than his vision, which leads him to his purpose after all.

 

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.