Tag: music

An Interview With Rapper Young Yeama

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Young Yeama is a rapper; here is a link to his website:

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcICjdDa0qBDxExBjho8Tyw

 

Q: What made you want a career in music?

 

A: I started late coming from a Christian church background, being taught that secular music was from the devil and what not so I didn’t grow up listening to Nas, Jay Z, Tupac and the like. I was introduced to HipHop around 11 or 12 when that ‘Tell Me If You Want Somebody’ by Aaliyah and Timberland came out, you know, with the baby whining along with the beat. I fell in love with the way the beat was orchestrated and went ahead to create my own beats after being engulfed in the Bay Area music scene ‘going dumb’ ‘hyphy movement, etc. So when it comes to making music now, it’s natural. Like, I’ll record in my studio and beat myself to shingles to perfect my work, even if it still sounds shitty to the next person. But when I’m finshed, the burst of excitement that runs through my body, my mind explodes and I’m freakin happy! I’m going to do what makes me happy, at 27 years old, before working for anybody else at this point in my life.

 

Q: What motivates you to write?

 

A: Life motivates me to write. Interacting with people, partying, relationships, working, trapping, and trying to get some pussy, smoking weed, how much money I just spent is all motivation to write. The good and bad‎, the struggles and the blessings are motivation and I feel I express that best through music, words. Being heard motivates me as well as the lucrative incentives.

 

Q: What is the story behind, Because You A Thot?

 

A: I was in a relationship with a woman whom appeared to be modest in every sense of the word. She was very pretty but covered herself and worked and went to school. I fell in love. She falls in love. She literally brings me back to my hometown, my place of birth, East Oakland, California and I fell in love all over again, this time with a city rather than a woman. Things got hard for me financially and I took my frustrations out on her, verbally, which lead to an agreement on taking a ‘break.’ I needed this break to do a self-reflection on myself and stop trying to make everyone else happy and do what I want. I guess she thought the same thing because two weeks being apart and she with the next nigga. This was shocking to me as I loafed in disbelief and believed that they were just co-worker friends until I hacked her phone. Don’t worry, Jesus whispered the password in my ear, I swear. I found pics of her naked with this bafoon! In my video, ‘A Break’ I catch them at the mall together!! But I’m glad I found out because even after I found them at the mall, Izzy came back and made very passionate and rough love to me! Head Honcho! Three days later I find the nudes and couldn’t get out of bed, the pain, I never felt it before. Hence: Because You A Thot and A Break. ‘Now I just play with these guns and rap! Nigga butt hurt off of love! Ya.. ya.. yaaa.. yaaaa..’

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we hear this in your music?

 

A: Andre 3000 best emcee ever!

Lil B BasedGod greatest rapper alive!

Thom Yorke is my idol!

Sigur Ros‎ are my ancestors!

 

I like to think of myself as eclectic ‎when referencing my music. From slow to fast, love to hate, sing to rap to rock to mumble, God, Pagans, you name it! My flow, the way I lay the words over the beat is deeper than an art, almost like it’s a science to it. I get that from Andre. My consistency with over 300 songs under various names from years ago; I get that from BasedGod. My mating calls or soft yells I get from Thom and the rhymthm, even though very different, one like myself is able to find a linking bridge.

 

 

Q: How do you decide what to wear in your videos?

 

A: Wear something that’s not in your other videos. I’m doing so much shopping now I feel like a diva. But as an independent artist, I have to work on my image. I just want to look clean! Always some fresh kicks on my feet unless I decide to go vintage. Most of the time it’s spur of the moment because when you are the rapper, producer, marketer, video producer and writer, video editor, engineer and cast, shit can get hectic!

 

Q: How do you finance your videos?

 

A: I used to shoot everything on my BlackBerry Passport until I copped a video recorder and on average I spend about $10 to $20 a video. My cousin does the camera work for a couple hits if the weed, gas, break food and we good. Just time to get creative. The Bay Area offers a great amount of visuals, both natural and artistic, to shoot videos and have them looking fancy.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your music?

 

A: I sell drugs and I rap about it. I rap about how I should stop because I’ll only end up dead or in jail but being a Black dread head convict doesn’t help either. I can’t get a job. Regardless of my conviction, I’m still black with dreads. Not to following the assumptions but that’s all I can do now to prevent homelessness. I know it sounds pitiful but aye, they want it. Fuck it. I’m getting tired of getting rejection emails our the interviewer looking at my hair more than my resume. I’m tired of being told ‘no’ to work for $14 dollars a hour everyday! Fuck that! I’m worth way more! My art will save me one day.

 

 

Q: What’s the point of referring to woman as hoes? Why not just call them women?

 

A: Women and hoes are two different things just like men and niggas are two different things. When I mention a hoe, that what she is, she sells her body or simply enjoys sleeping with rich niggas/men.‎ Girls tell me to hit them on therie service line when I wanted company and all for free, just because I was ‘different’ and ‘not like everyone else’. I guess. But I like em! They in the same boat as me! I sell something different but you get my gist. Hoes make you feel good. They were revered in the bibilcial times and even necessary in some cultures. Lol, let me stop.

 

Q: What is the oddest thing you have done to promote your music?

 

A: Travel around the Bay Area and post stickers of myself throwing up my middle fingers with Young Yeama printed in bright colors on poles posts, mailboxes, walls, storefronts, etc! Got chased by the police once and got away!! Hehehe!

 

Q: What would you like to changes about the San Francisco music scene?

 

A: Big big difference between San Francisco music and Oakland music when it comes to rap but the Bay Area collectively, I would love for us to get the recognition we deserve so badly. Everybody bitting our style and getting rich off of it and even though people know it’s talent in the Bay Area, they over look us for some odd reason so recognition for sure!

 

 Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

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An Interview Folk Singer Jay Elle

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Jay Elle is a folk music artist who has just released the EP Rising Tide; here is a link to his website:
http://www.jayelle222.com/

 

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a performer?

 

A: Great question. My first performance was a bit part in an elementary school play. I was carrying a small chest. I was one of the kings bringing gifts to the baby Jesus.

 

I loved the whole experience except that I had to wear tights and for some reason I didn’t dig that part of the outfit so much. Otherwise, I enjoyed appearing in front of an audience and I guess that was enough of a jumpstart to get me going.

 

I did not get into music until a few years later, in grammar school. But once I started playing guitar and singing with bands there was no doubt that performing music was the way to go for me. The more I did it, the more I wanted to do it. It was just a lot of fun. And still is.

 

Q: Why folk music?

 

A: Folk is a genre that I love because it can bring together great music and great lyrics. It gives you a lot of freedom, especially when you are by yourself: one voice and one guitar. The possibilities are endless. And it is a lot easier to travel with an acoustic guitar.

 

It is only one of the genres I enjoy exploring though. Add to that other ways to use a guitar or many guitars. My debut EP, Rising Tide, brings together different guitar based orchestrations and arrangements.

 

I love variety in an album, much like what you find in the “News of the World” or “Jazz” albums by Queen, or the first albums by Billy Joel for instance.

 

I would love to include at least one instrumental guitar piece on my upcoming CD, or have one or more available for download. I write classical inspired pieces for guitars, pieces that I think might actually be potential Ballet dance music.

 

In my view, an album should be a journey to various places, much like a live performance. I would love for me and my guitar to take you to a dance hall, the Appalachians, or a Chicago Blues club while you sit in your favorite chair. Even better if I can make you time travel…

 

Folk music written for guitar is one of these genres and a great starting point. The rest of the EP, “Rising Tide,” gives you other flavors. On the second song, “Twelve on Sunday,” I use a nylon string Ovation and no other instrument. It’s just me and my guitar. The other songs were recorded with a full band and incorporate edgy rock elements, varying from one song to the next. They all tell a story that is meaningful to me lyrically.

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we see this in your music?

 

A: I admire anyone who writes well-crafted songs from Cole Porter to many contemporary writers you hear on the radio today, in all genres. Of course, I have my preferences, writers who combine lyrics and music in a very unique way, and happen to be amazing musicians and singers or performers, some of which are now classics in my mind: Billy Joel, Freddie Mercury, Paul McCartney, Sting, Eminem, Snoop Dogg,…etc.

 

I am a big fan of Billy Idol, B.B. King, Katy Perry, Elvis Presley, Pink, Avril Lavigne, Celine Dion, Selena Gomez, Justin Bieber, Pat Benatar, Eric Clapton, Jay Z, Beyoncé, etc… so the list is quite long and eclectic. Add to that classical composers like Bach, Chopin and Liszt, to name only a few, and the list of influences becomes endless.

 

Hopefully, my songs reflects my openness to music in general and, over time, I hope to share more and more of my discovering different genres and what I find exciting when I listen to other writers and performers.

 

If there is a second universal language, beside love, it would be music, in my humble opinion. Bringing people together through songs and music is a fantastic opportunity to “make the world a better place.” That may sound a bit idealistic of course. To me, bringing people together means being open and looking forward to hearing something new and different. Perhaps it’s an offshoot of the New York City cultural melting pot model. When you think about it, New York City brings together such various groups of people in a very peaceful way compared to places in the world where much less cultural variety seem to be more threatening to some groups of people. I would say that one of my overall messages is “keep an open mind.”

 

Q: What do you look for in the people that you collaborate with?

 

A: A completely different view point and approach to what I do. Lots of creativity and skills I don’t have.

 

Otherwise, I would run around in circles. I do my best to challenge myself and “think outside my little box, the one between my ears,” but it’s a lot of fun when you have the opportunity to include other artists and share knowledge and experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What has been the most successful thing you have done to promote your music?

 

A: Working with Star1 Records and MTS Management Group has been amazing. Laura Patterson, the head of Star1 Records has a fantastic team. Sherry works with College Radio stations and over 100 of them are playing songs from the EP “Rising Tide,” which was released on December 1st, 2016.

 

Michael Stover (MTS Management Group) has lined up great interviews like this one. It has been the perfect example of team work from day one. I am forever grateful for the energy and time they are dedicating to the promotion of “Rising Tide.”

 

Laura has brought Chris Purcell on board to create and direct a video of “You Got Away,” the third cut on the EP. Chris is both a very talented director and animator. I am very excited about the concept he came up with and I look forward to presenting the video to people. A great video can be a powerful promotional tool.

 

Q: What has been the least successful?

 

A: I have dabbled with some of the well-known Internet social sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, etc…

 

I think I have much to learn to use them effectively. I look forward to that challenge in the coming months. These sites are great. I just need to do my homework.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your music?

 

I have hopped from office jobs to office jobs, either managing projects for marketing companies or insurance companies.

 

Seven years ago my mom passed away after battling breast cancer. She left me a little bit of money and some wise words: “Time passes faster than we think.”

 

So, I decided to save up as much money as possible and cut down on my expenses. I have a very tiny studio in Manhattan. I don’t have a car, I don’t have cable, and I don’t buy anything I don’t need. I also have a very generous aunt who helps out as much as she can. She bought me my first guitar, and my second guitar as well.

 

I quit working a year ago altogether to dedicate myself to making music for as long as I possibly can, living off my savings. I hope at some point I can generate enough income to support myself. As with any small business though, the first years are expenses after expenses and very little income.

 

I love that I can dedicate myself to writing and recording songs, and be available for interviews and supporting the promotion of my debut EP, Rising Tide.

 

It’s a big leap of faith.

 

 

Q: What is your creative process?

 

A: Stitching and sewing.

 

I practice guitar and sing every day. Part of the practice time is dedicated to pure improvisation and during that time I occasionally hear some musical ideas that I like. I record the ideas on a small Olympus Digital Voice Recorder and keep on going. Every few days I listen back to what I have recorded. I have tons of them. When one really catches my attention and keeps coming back to my mind I dedicate time to it on a daily basis to see where it wants to go.

 

I also write a lot of lyrics. Some of them were put to music by other artists. I collect words that I think I could use eventually.

 

I find that music leads the way, sometimes immediately associated to lyrics or a lyrical idea or an image that I translate to words. Most of the time I look for lyrics in my collection that could go well with a musical idea. When I start with a “finished” lyric I am rarely happy with the result. I need to get better at that. Some people can do it super well.

 

Then the process gets tedious as I go back and forth between the music and lyrics, that’s the stitching and sewing, if you will.

 

I get to what I feel is a finished product at some point and start recording a guitar and vocal track.

 

Then there is more listening and fine tuning. It’s really the song that tells me when it’s done. If I can listen to it from beginning to end without “stopping myself,” then it’s done. Sometimes my mind stops over and over at the same place in the song and it can take a long time to figure out why.

 

Some parts of the song come out just right and I never question them. I never stop while I listen to these parts. I couldn’t tell you why either.

 

I wish I could just pick up my guitar, turn on the recorder, sing and play and have a whole song come out all at once. A good one of course. Done! That would be great. Hasn’t happened yet.

 

Q: What is the overall theme of Rising Tide?

 

A: “Rising Tide” is both the title of the first song on the EP, and the title of the EP.

 

I would say the overall theme of the EP is “standing for yourself and others.” By yourself, or with others. It’s a theme I like as we all face challenges in life. How we deal with challenges is very revealing of who we are. We learn from each one of them. And no matter what happens, we have to get back up on our feet, should the outcome be disappointing. Sometimes we are elated by unexpected positive results. Either way.

 

One thing I believe we realize pretty quickly is that nothing can be achieved by one individual alone, as much as society glorifies “individual achievements,” there is no individual achievement. Nothing good or bad is achieved by one person.

 

We should be aware of what we stand for and why, who we influence, who influences us, knowingly or unknowingly so.

 

There is a famous statement and provocative poem that I think illustrate this perfectly. It was written by Pastor Martin Niemöller (1892–1984) about the cowardice of German intellectuals following the Nazis‘ rise to power and subsequent purging of their chosen targets, group after group. It is titled “First they came …”

 

“First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

 

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

 

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

 

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.”

 

Martin Niemöller

 

It’s easy to follow without questioning. Keep an open mind but question everything.

 

For the song “Rising Tide,” I experienced missing someone in my life and the emotion was so powerful that it brought to mind how no one can stop the tide when it comes in.

 

You may be able to fight a fire, but rising waters will rise until they stop on their own. The feeling of being on an island and watching water rising around you while you stand on the last piece of ground reflected my state of mind. Especially in this case, where I did not know how the other person felt. It added to the loneliness of the experience and the need to keep going.

 

Q: If you could ask any famous folk singer in history a question, who would you ask and what would you ask him or her?

 

A: I would ask Bob Dylan if he would be willing to collaborate on a song. That is, if he would allow me to sit quietly while I watch and listen. I’d go get coffee every now and then.

 

 Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

 

An Interview With Singer Aleisha Simpson

 

alish

 

Aleisha Simpson is the lead singer for the band Heart Avail; here is a link to their self titled  album:

 

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/heart-avail-ep/id1175584934?l=en

 

 

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a musician?

 

A:  I’ve known I wanted to be a musician since the 8th grade. I was in choir and was being tested on some music theory. I started singing and the whole class went quiet and my music teacher put me in the select choir that day. I was a really shy kid so getting that kind of attention and realizing I was really good at something, changed my life.

 

Q: Why heavy metal?

 

A: I think we are considered more symphonic metal then heavy since we have the operatic vocals instead of screaming. Honestly I always figured I would end up doing music like Sarah McLachlan or Sarah Brightman. I play piano and that’s how I began composing music. But once I met Greg, I knew I had finally found my nitch. Greg writes really symphonic and complex pieces that somehow are perfectly fit to my voice and range.

Since our first attempt at songwriting I knew I never wanted to go back to just being a classically trained singer. I love the challenge that each new piece presents and makes me go outside of my musical box.

 

Q: Who are your biggest musical influences and how can we hear it in your music?

 

A: Heart Avail is very heavily influenced by European rock. Bands like Nightwish and WithinTemptation are some of our biggest influences as they also do really strong operatic vocals with a heavy symphonic instrumental sound. The U.S. hasn’t quite adopted this form of music yet with the exception of Evanescence. When I heard my first Evanescence song, I was instantly hooked. Greg and I defintiley follow the style of our fellow female fronted European bands and since we intend on traveling there we think this works out just fine for us J

 

Q: What kinds of life experiences do you like to write about?

 

A: Oh gosh, we have had so many. Honestly some of my favorite experiences are meeting other bands and our fans. This last tour we did for New Year’s Eve was one of our most memorable for sure. We met up with LaRissa Vienna and the Strange, another female fronted rock band that I had been trying to get together with for a year. They got signed with our management company to which I was thrilled and so we finally got to meet these guys on December 30. And it was amazing; the bands had instant chemistry with each other and were totally supportive of every member. It’s so rare that you meet bands that not only have talent but are humble and in that band, we found both. The bands danced with each other, stayed up together, had breakfast in the morning, we all talked to our fans and treated them in a thankful manor and just showed such a sense of comradery that I left tour with a full heart.  Our New Year’s Eve was brought in with style and full celebration together and I couldn’t have imagined a better way to spend it.

That’s just one of the many experiences but it’s the one freshest in my mind and honestly one of the best moments of my musical career.

 

Q:  Who is your biggest musical influence and how can we hear it in your music?

 

A: I think this is a repeat of question three but I will see who my biggest musical influence in my life was my grandfather. When I was a little girl I used to sit at the guitar with my grandpa. He would write and play music for me and those moments were always so special. When he died I knew that I had to continue on the legacy and make him proud.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your music?

 

A: I currently work at a drug and alcohol treatment center for teen girls. For me personally, music isn’t just about getting my music out there. Musicians have the ability to have a huge impact on the world around them and that has always been my goal. I want to inspire these girls that no matter how hard their circumstances and no matter what they have been through, that they can live their dream. I want to give them hope that they can get past this addiction; they can live a better life, a life that is full of promise and hope and has so much beauty in it. In our music, a lot of our lyrics are inspired by loss and depression and conquering both of these things. I want that, I want to inspire everyone around me, that they can overcome anything.

 

Q: You are a female fronted heavy metal band. Have you had to deal with much sexism?

 

A: Oh yeah. I started out this sweet innocent girl with big dreams and a view that everyone is good and wants you to succeed, which people instantly tried to crush so I had to become much harder. Unfortunately if you don’t take shit from people, you are instantly labeled a bitch. If a guy is rough and a jerk to people, he’s metal as hell, but if a girl doesn’t take shit from anyone and runs her band like a business, we get the “bitch” label. The problem is when you aren’t a female who takes off her clothes in music and refuses to be pushed around; you have to work even harder to get people to listen to you. To me, just because I’m a girl, it doesn’t mean that I shouldn’t be treated as an equal in rock. I’m not going to start bawling in the middle of a set, or throw tantrums, like I’ve seen a lot of my fellow male musicians do, and yet there is always this stigma that girls just aren’t as good. It’s always funny to see the look of shock on people’s faces when they hear us for the first time. Yes I’m wearing a dress and my hair is curled and I just rocked your face off, get over it. My fans know I love and appreciate them and I didn’t have to sleep with anyone to get where I am and I am really proud of that.

 

Q: What is the song, “Broken Fairytale” about?

 

A: “Broken Fairytale” was written in the middle of a very bad breakup. When I was little I had this dream that I would meet a prince on a black, not white horse that would come rescue me and we would live happily ever after. Unfortunately, that prince never came and each one that came a long crushed a little more of my heart. So when Greg presented me with the music of Broken Fairytale we discussed how we wanted a really happy instrumental sounding piece with really dark lyrics. So I made my own fairytale out of the lyrics. Broken Fairytale is a metaphor for a broken relationship that almost destroyed me and a warning to girls who try and stay in destructive relationships.

 

Q:  What have you done to promote yourselves?

 

A: The first thing I realized about music was that no one is out looking for you. In other words I had to find every outlet possible to get our music heard because I believe we have a good product worth “selling”. So I began to search for podcast radio stations, online magazines, anyone who said they were looking for Indie artists I sent music to, no matter how big or small those companies were. It took a lot of time, I no longer have a social life, lol, and sacrifice, but we began to get noticed and approached by companies instead of me approaching them. When we got offered opportunities to hang out with people in the industry and get pointers on how to be better musicians, we took those opportunities no matter how much money they cost because we want to be the best musicians and band we can possibly be. We have run an 8 week radio campaign with our single “Broken Fairytale” and it topped online charts for 10 months. We then did a 3 month press campaign with Asher Media Relations where he got us published worldwide and we released our first 5 song EP with on iTunes through our distribution label, Milagro records. We also played at Sundance Film Festival last year and spent 10 days there networking with people and also went to Nashville, and California to meet up with industry people as well. In other words, a whole heck of a lot. I am promoting our band 24/7.

 

Q:  What is your most horrible music industry story?

 

A: Uhhhh. This year we got invited to attend a music conference in Nashville Tennessee with the intent on meeting people in the industry who wanted to teach musicians how to succeed in the music industry. We were told we were handpicked and that our music would be distributed to labels, radio stations, sponsors etc. but we had to pay to get to Nashville. So we bought our plane tickets, booked our hotels and Greg, my manager Kim K. Jones and I flew to Nashville. The first thing we saw was this “Christian” based event had jacked up parking to $25 a day just for their lot. We then got into the building and registered for the classes we wanted to take. And so began the four day conference. During this conference everyone was pretty much told, you are not good enough in the music industry, its evil and the only way you can succeed as a musician is if you donate your talent to “God” oh and pay this guy or that guy money so he can make you a better musician. Everything involved large amounts of money that was musicians were expected to pay and then told they needed to preach to people about the grace of God…….one guy insisted if you paid him $400 you could be as good as Taylor Swift. Each speaker told horrible stories of how they had lived, and really really bad stories that just made you feel dirty and then a speaker would get up and say and I quote “None of you are going to be good enough to make it in the music industry but God will take you. “ Bands had traveled from all over the world for this event to be told, you aren’t good enough. It was horrible and discouraging as hell and we left angry. Luckily my manager salvaged the trip by introducing us to an incredible guy with an amazing music studio and we did have a good time once we realized we did not want anything to do with this company and in fact skipped the last two days so that we could just tour Nashville, which is cool as hell fyi.

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview With Country Singer Richard Lynch

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Richard Lynch is a country singer who just released the single, We’re America Proud; here is a link to his YouTube page:

 

 

 

 

Q: What inspired you to write “We’re America Proud?”

 

A: It started from the need to have a jingle for a radio show I am doing on Renegade Radio Nashville, so the jingle was wrote and I aimed it towards true all Americans such as truck drivers, farmers and soldiers.   I was inspired to mention God and then the jingle was born.  My wife thought the jingle should be made into a full song.   So I wrote the country song We’re American Proud
Q:  What separates it from other country songs?

 

A: I have a true love and appreciation for what our country is all about and that is what inspired the song and sets it apart from other songs

 

Q:  Who are some of your musical influences and how can we hear it in your music?

 

A: My influences have been my Dad Woody Lynch who was a great country singer as well as the greats such as Keith Whitley, Conway Twitty and Mel Street

 

Q: How did your band get together?

 

A: I have been friends with and known my bass player for almost 35 years, he played with me the first time when he was just 15.  My drummer and steel guitar player have been with me over 20 years, I have a new guitar player and the keyboard player we used had been a member of Yankee Gray.   All of us are from the southwest Ohio area which has a huge country music influence from all of the people who migrated here from Kentucky and the Appalachians

 

Q: You work as a barn designer. How did you get into that profession?

 

A: I grew up on farm and my Dad taught me how to maintain the buildings that required a lot of upkeep and I have made a living for more than 35 years building and designing barns

 

Q: How does t effect your ability to perform music?

 

A: I am not building as many barns as I had in the past because of how busy we have become with our music.

 

Q: What are some common misconceptions about country music?

 

A: The biggest misconception is that the new music being played on mainstream radio is not country music.  Country music has more character than drum loop, generic lyrics you cant understand that has downgraded the music that it has no country soul to it

 

Q: What is “A Better Place” about?

 

A: A story about lost love that ends in tragedy and yet the love continues in the fellow’s passing away

Q:  What has been your greatest professional accomplishment?

A: Hearing my music being played on internet shows, radio, TV and to see people in the audience sing songs I have wrote.

Q: If you could write a song for anyone who would it be?

 

A: I have wrote songs for and about my Dad and he continues to influence my music every day

 

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

 

An Interview With Hip Hop Artist Vincent Cruz Montano

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Vincent Cruz Montano is a hip hop artist; here is a link to his YouTube page:

 

Q: What made you interested in music?

 

A: Music has always been a delivery of validation. Remembering back to the first song I enjoyed as a kid was by a female artist named Paula Abdul called Rush, Rush. Other than having an early spark toward the music my parents were listening to, I have also enjoyed listening to all kinds throughout my years into adulthood. Not until I started making music did I feel an inner spike which has me by the heart. It’s like being an artist helped my appreciation and feeling of content towards nowadays artist which assist me in catching their drift.

 

Q: What sets you apart from other hip hop artist?

 

A: Every artist whether Country or Hip Hop has their one percent illustrated through craft. Nothing specifically sets me apart though I can only surmise a few differences that might be substantial. For example, my song called “Donkey Kong Beat” took me about three to four weeks to get it sounding the way it does. If I did have to site something specific, it would be the one percent statement in other words. I try my best to have multiple one percent’s isolated from one another vs. one percent’s that coat tail from radio format. Not that there is anything wrong with coat tailing. My preference is to only practice that formation based on your own signature for development and growth.

 

Q:  Who are some of your musical influences and how is that evidenced in your music?

 

A: Tom Petty, Third Eye Blind, and Cyndi Lauper to name a few of my most liked besides Chvrches. Specifically Tom Petti in a song I use the lyric “Last name Jane first Marry what’s the chance?” Listening to Out Of The Vein by Third Eye Blind, upon recently graduating Burlingame high school, was I very pleased and subtly influence towards the concept of lyric being personal and containing memento vibe. Cyndi Lauper blows my mind with a few of her songs. “Money Changes Everthing” makes me consider the dedication and obligation of and to being a Star boy.

 

Q: What is the most innovative thing you have done to promote yourself?

 

A: Other than almost buying in bulk customized thumb drives, I have collaborations with a few rappers that have seemed to reflect the level of energy on target for radiation. Also, I once did a radio show though I am not sure how many people were able to listen. I have preferred to stay low key with my music. I also got propositioned to play my song at a club for a c-note by Ric Lee. Though I declined and used that payment toward another track. He gave me a heads up I wasn’t ready for. Getting your music out there takes a lot of resources.

 

Q: What trends in music annoy you?

 

A: No specific trends annoy me enough to call them out at face value. Irritation occurs when fifty one percent of the song is about you and what you think vs. know. Figuring something out was the most exciting thing that artist usually do as they start out. Then either you stick to that through mimicking, which works for some. Or you reach outside your comfort zone and make some songs with a message people can learn from through applying to themselves.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have?

 

A: I work at a Homeless Shelter. Due to importance of school having illustrated itself at this point, I plan on going back to school once it starts up again. I also have a moving job that occurs between two and three times a month. Though my moving job pays healthier than my job at the shelter, I feel that my shelter job gets me use to my fall back area of focus should music never find me. At least I can share with people starting today till my last. Being able to share music at work has been successful so far. I have a few new fans.

 

 

Q: How do your experiences at your day job influences your writing?

 

A: Nodaway I find myself writing poetry. Sharing with those around me has had its moments.

Being able to hang around with individuals with a wonder wall has its perks and moments of reality check. Engaging in conversations enables the message and energy to illustrate validation uncontested. Whether or not someone can change post a single conversation is debatable. However I find myself changing after simple interactions and quality of bounce back pertaining to respect. Listening to the way some are closed vs. being open has me very validated and content with my line of work. This holiday season allows for friendly suggestions being at least considered. Such as, just a phone call sends a message of love regardless of circumstance when you are just checking in for holiday wishes.

 

 

Q: What kind of themes do you like to explore in your music?

 

A: The theme of metaphors is fun to explore. Something to be taken away from the experience with aims to captivate. Being able to deliver a theme that tries to float as universal is a go to for me and music.

 

Q: What inspired the song Tropical Shawdy?

 

A: My First real girlfriend took me on vacation to Hawaii for the first time I had even been. I had the best time of my life through exploring what a real vacation feels like. Upon coming home, I was asked by a friend to make a second trip in the near future at that time. I invited my gf to come along though I did make the mistake of informing her that it was an all guys trip. But asking my friend if she could go, he responded with an of course. The flight time was only days away when he informed me that two of his gf’s would be attending to make the trip more affordable and to have some wing ladies. She found out and was not too happy.

 

Q: What is your theme song and why?

 

A: The “Donkey Kong Beat” is only rivaled by one other for top spot in area of theme song. I say this because the DK project took me several weeks to make acceptable. I have a number of rough drafts that needed to be combed over till it sounds the way it does. Not only the time but the energy and effort happened to go into it has a message about direction for The Vandals. My family helped me out with this song by providing their dedication as well. Though I know for a fact that I was a nuisance to Scandal for how many time I asked him to work on this project. He would always ask “why are you still working on the same song for such a long time?” Maybe eight years in the future you will have a worthy answer I would tell him.

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

 

An Interview With Rapper Shug Jackson

shug

 

 

Shug Jackson is a rapper who just released the single Congratulations; here is a link to his YouTube page:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQkcB51t2-y-8JHdkMN9J8Q

 

 

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a rapper?

 

A: I started writing when I was in the 6th grade and by the next year I new that this is what I wanted to do because I got good at it really fast.

Q: What sets you apart from other rappers?

 

A:  What sets me apart from other rappers is my willingness to touch on topics that most are afraid of touching. My willingness and desire to talk about very serious issues and then talk about finding my Angel. I believe that we all have different emotions and I have no problem expressing all of them.

 

Q: What inspired you to write your single, Congratulations?

 

 A: I was sitting on my couch one day watching the news and they were talking about this child that got killed by a stray bullet. I’ve seen, I’ve known and do know people that have been killed or hit by bullets that wasn’t meant for them and it’s all senseless and needs to stop.

Q: Who are some of your influences?

 

 A:  Some of my influences are Ice Cube, The late Great Eazy E, LL Cool J, Jay Z. I’m a huge old school fan of Rap and also R&B.

Q: How did you go about getting your first recording deal with Def Jam Records?

A:  I got my First Record deal back in 1991 and that came about when I was opening up for DJ Quik, his manager at the time heard me, asked me for a demo and 2 weeks later I signed to Def Jam Records.

 

Q: What is the biggest change you have seen in the music industry in all the years that you have been working?

A:  The biggest change I’ve seen in the industry in all these years is the lack of Great subject matters. Over the years the music has gone from talking about real life stuff, things that hit home and touched the soul, to things that have no substance in my opinion.

Q: You have opened for a lot of big names. What was the most memorable show you ever did and what made it memorable?

A:  My most memorable moment opening for big named acts was my very first show with Eazy E and NWA in my hometown of Tucson Arizona at the skating ring. It sticks with me because that’s the very moment that I learned how to be professional and demand the audiences attention.

Q: What sort of day jobs have you worked in your life and how have they influenced your music?

A:  Day jobs for me has been Roofing, working for the City of Tucson with my father and Plumbing. I’ve learned how to work hard and try to be the best at whatever I do and I carry that same mentality over into my music.

Q: What inspired you to write, It Only Gets Better?

A:  What inspired me to write It Only Gets Better was me knowing that without The woman there is no man. I looking at what women go through everyday and it’s hard, women have the hardest job on the planet and I respect them more than anything.

Q: Who plays you in the movie?

A: In 5 years from now, whatever actor is Hot at that time is two one who plays me in the movie!

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

An Interview With Hip Hop Artist Wavy Lee

wavy

Wavy Lee is a hip hop artist who recently released the single Wavy Nights; here is a link to his Soundcloud page:

 

https://soundcloud.com/wavylee/wavy-lee-wavy-nights
Q:  What kind of musical background do you have?

 
A: I was a Producer since I was 14 and an audio Engineer since I was about 19.

 
Q: What made you want to become a recording artist?

 

 

A: Well I felt that the music that I was hearing on the radio was not as good as the stuff
I was making at home with my equipment so I just kept recording and really became an artist by accident.

 

Q:  Who are some of your musical influences?
A: James Brown, outkast, J. Cole

 

Q: What inspired you to write Wavy Nights?

 
A: I had a girl that worked with me that I used to like she told me she was a gogo dancer at a club. One night I went out and actually seen her at the club and It made me write wavy nights.

 

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your music?

 
A: Im in customer service and sales , I dont think it influences my music much but it does influence the way I take care of my music business.

 


Q:
What is your weirdest work story?

 

 
A: I was training a newcomer at work once and she was an older lady. She seemed weird but I never said anything to my bosses. On her first day of training, she defecated on herself. Poop rolled down her leg and made a trail around the store.

 

 

Q: What do you like about the music industry?

 
A: Being able to meet other people with talent that may think just like you, so there is no room for them to call you weird

 

 

Q:  What would you change about it?

 

 
A: The Cookie cutter artist that pop up everyday, I feel like nobody is original these days.

Q:
What’s the story behind the name Wavy Lee?

 

 
A Well I wanted to change my name from Cam DaGreat , I felt like people where trying to be funny when they said it to me . So I wanted something different. I liked the phrase wavy so I just added my Middle name to it and Wavy Lee was born.

 
Q:  Who do you think is the most underrated in hip hop today?
A: Childish Gambino

 

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.