Tag: wickid pissa

AN Interview With Hip-Hop Artist Vernon Little

 

TheMeeting (2).jpg

 

Vernon Little is a Hip-Hop artist who just released the album, Double Minded; here is a link to his Reverbnation page:

https://www.reverbnation.com/vernonlittle

 

Q: What made you interested in Music? 

 

A; I was  fan of rap music since I first heard it while growing up in the Bronx. A Local DJ named Joe Stick gave me my first opportunity to rap.

 

Q:  Why did you choose Christian music? 

 

A: After so many years of trying to put out a project, I felt in my spirit that God was telling me to honor Him with my music, and He’ll open some doors for me.

 

Q: Who are some of your influences and how can we hear it in your music?

 

A: Kool G Rap. On my song, The Chance To Tell You, I tried to make three or four words rhyme in every two bars like he does.

 

Q: What is the overall theme of  ‘”Double Minded?” 

 

A: Put God first in your life, and everything will fall into place.

 

Q: If someone were only going to listen to one song on the album, what should it by and why?

 

A:  The Chance To Tell You. It has good music, rapping, singing, and a positive message.

Q:  What kind of day job do you have and how does it influence your work? 

 

A: I work for the transit authority in NYC. I come in contact with 100’s of people a day – five days a week which enables me to cross paths with music lovers and network.

 

Q: What separates you from other Christian Rappers? 

 

A: My music has an old-school feel to it.

 

Q:  How did you come to be affiliated with Bentley Records? 

 

A: I submitted some music to an independent music promoter. They heard it and reached out to me.

 

Q: What kind is your strangest performance story?

A: My very first performance with my former group, Def Duo, at Rice High School, we had to perform on lunchroom tables.

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

Advertisements

An Interview With Screenwriter Marina Shron

 

 

marina2 (1)

Marina Shron is the writer and director of the film, “Fruit of Our Womb”; here is a link to the website:

 

https://www.thefruitofourwomb.com/

 

 

Q: What is, “Fruit of Our Womb” about?

 

A: The story follows Christina is a 13-year-old sexually fluid street girl who has grown up trading sex for love and protection. Her chance meeting with an affluent Manhattan couple turns out to be a stroke of luck when she is welcomed into their world.  But what starts out as a utopian dream soon degenerates into a nightmare of love, deceit, and mutual manipulation.

 

 

Q: What inspired you to make the movie?

 

A: My inspiration for the screenplay was two-fold. On the one hand, I was inspired by the character herself – Christina. She’s the heart of the film. Innocent and manipulative, ethereal and lethal – she’s a child-woman who discovers the world by touch.  She was deprived of childhood, of normal family… But there is something elemental and powerful about her existence that makes her a magnet for others, more privileged than herself.  Her presence reveals the best – and the worst – in those who come in touch with her. Once dropped inside the couple’s world, she will either make it explode — or alter its entire fabric…

 

But if Christina herself is unique – her story is not. While doing research for the film I’ve heard countless stories of women and girls who were exploited, betrayed – and, ultimately, blamed for that very abuse by the adults who were supposed to protect them. Unfortunately, we live in a society that makes this cruel paradox possible.  By making this film, I wanted to dig deeper beneath the surface of the incestuous, in nature, family dynamic and try to understand what makes it so pervasive.

 

 

 

Q: What would you say motivates each of the three main characters in the film?

 

A: Initially, each character has very simple, basic motivation – Christina needs home, Lynn needs a child, Joe needs peace and quite in his family. But like all of us, humans, they tend to misconstrue their needs – and when their true needs surface, they come as a surprise to the characters themselves and to us, the audience. Without giving away the ending, I can just say that Christina leads the couple to the brink of the discovery of what really missing from their lives… I say “the brink” because it scares the hell out of them. And I’m not talking about the couple’s sexual needs or fantasies but something that’s much more sublime… and uncanny.

 

 

 

 

Q: How do you think an American audience will respond to the character of Christina?

 

A: Haha, this remains to be seen!  I’m sure she will be a divisive figure…. She’s not your girl next door. Christina is an outsider, and her existence is marginal, both regarding her social status and her sexuality… But on the other hand,  that’s what  make her a quint-essentially American character… So I hope people will relate to her!

 

 

Q:  If people invest in your film, will they be able to share in any profits?

 

 

A: Absolutely! We will be drafting a profit-participation agreement with each one of our investors once the film is fully financed!

 

 

Q:  Who are some of your film making influences?

 

A: I love Lynne Ramsay films – her early  “Rat Catcher” is one of my biggest inspirations. Catherine’s Breiilat “Fat Girl” is another one…  I’ve always been inspired by films with a uniquely female perspective… but not only by films directed by women. My biggest influence — in the way I approach filmmaking in general –  is the grandfather of surrealism, Luis Bunuel.

 

 

Q:  You teach screenwriting at The New School. What makes your class different from other screenwriting classes?

 

A: I give a lot of creative exercises to my students – and not just the exercises on structure and character development but exercises that help to develop their imagination… that tap into their physical and emotional memory.

 

I also show my students a lot of films of diverse styles and perspectives, from different time periods – and I show them next to each other, without providing a “historical perspective.” I believe the best cinematic works belong to the natural world, and not just the world of culture. I’m sure many academics will disagree with me! But this is how I teach film and screenwriting…

 

Q: What is your most memorable classroom story?

 

A: In one of my introductory filmmaking classes, I showed two short films, almost back to back… One was a very well executed if somewhat cheesy love story. Another was an experimental 1972 short film by Chantal Akerman,  “La Chambre” – a circular shot with a camera panning around the room for 11 minutes. I thought my students hated that film… But at the end of the semester, when they were presenting their final films, I was surprised to discover that one of the students drew his inspiration from both of these very different  films. His film was a love story told by a pan that goes around the room for 10 minutes!  And it was a gem of a film!

 

Q:  What mistakes do you see new screenwriters making?

 

A: One of the biggest mistakes new screenwriters make is relying too much on dialogue…over-explaining what the character feel and think.  Another mistake is trying to make a point or send a message that’s too obvious or clichéd.  Some say: “cliché is a cliché because it’s true”… something like that. I hate this expression.

I think real truth is always rooted in a paradox.

 

 

Q:  If you could remake any movie in history, what movie would you remake and why?

 

A: Kubrick “Lolita”… In a way, that’s what I’m doing with “The Fruit of Our Womb” –  remaking Lolita it’s from the girl’s perspective.  And because it’s a female point of view, Christina has to be a stronger, darker, more complex character than Nabokov/Kubrick’s heroine… She’s not at all a victim. I think of her as a perverse messenger of change.

 

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

An Interview With Director Roger Hill

 

 

 

 

Roger_Hill

Roger Hill is the writer and director of the film Huckleberry, which premieres at the Marina Del Rey Film Festival on October 13th at 9:00 pm. Here is a link to the films Facebook page:

 

www.facebook.com/huckleberrymovie

 

Q: What is “Huckleberry” about?

A: The synopsis reads:

  A story spanning the year 1999 to 2000, Huckleberry 18, transgender-male, dissident, comes from a poor community in the Rust Belt.  A region much maligned and challenging, and often misunderstood, much like himself; also a place and time where non-conforming identities are met with suspicion and, at times, violence.

Huckleberry, or Huck as his friends call him, pursues his unrequited love Jolene, who is adrift in an abusive relationship, in spite of her loathsome boyfriend, Clint.

Rebuffed, and armed with the knowledge of Clint’s abuse. Huckleberry confronts Clint once and for all, but not before unleashing hell upon him while still cloaked in the lingering shadow of his undiscovered intentions.

Huckleberry then discovers the consequence that follow his actions, both intended and not, life threatening and affirming, as he, his two best friends Will and Levon, Jolene and Clint all navigate a particularly intense year and confront the life-changing results of Huck’s decisions.

 

Q: What made you want to make a film about revenge?

A: Revenge is an interesting theme to explore.  I think growing up in America we receive a lot of mixed messages about revenge, ranging from “turn the other cheek” to an “eye for an eye.”  US media, mainstream religions, history, military and culture are full of contradictions about the morality of revenge.

I think as a teenager I thought about “getting even” a lot.  I think this was born from the struggles that are familiar for most teens growing up, especially for men, the pressure to live up to a masculine ideal and to not to be perceived as weak… or vulnerable.  One of my teenage revenge fantasies served as the initial seed for this film.  Now older and wiser I think I’m able to explore the topic from a nuanced position without glamorizing violence, while highlighting some of the conflicting messages we receive about revenge. I think who benefits and loses in the revenge equation is not always black and white, there are a lot of shades of gray.

Q: What makes Huck an interesting character?

A: I think the tableau of his life experience makes him a very intriguing character.  He is far from cookie cutter.  Huckleberry has a profound sense of righteous indignation towards arbitrary authority figures and revels in his rebelliousness.  He is a character who acts and doesn’t shy away from confrontation.  Huck doesn’t always make the right decisions, he is fallible, like anyone, but I also believe that he is relatable to anyone whose felt the pangs of an unrequited love who is saddled with an abusive partner.  Huck is also transgender, which is not really what the film is about, but does make for a more interesting protagonist and one that elicits the prejudices of his community.  Casting him often times as an outsider or a rebel.

Q: What is the overall theme of the film?

In society regular people often make moral concessions in order to secure a better life for themselves, within the parameters of social mores, even ones they fundamentally disagree with.  That revenge does have a cost, but there is also a benefit analysis which is unspoken but omnipresent.  That trans-men are just as capable as cis-men of absorbing and acting on aggressive impulses born from the narrative of protecting a woman whom they desire.

 

A: What characteristics did you look for in a lead actor?

In a very practical sense I was looking for a transgender man in his late teens or early twenties.  I was attracted to Dan’s smirk in his headshot on Backstage.  I could immediately picture him as Huckleberry.  Huck has a very distinct attitude in my mind.  He’s a rebel, charismatic but aloof at times and prone to anger.  I was looking for an actor who could carry these traits but also deliver an unspoken vulnerability, and I think that was something that Daniel Fisher-Golden brought to the character that was so humanizing.  Dan worked hard to convey the anger that was instrumental to the plot of the film, but he also tapped into a very personal sense of empathy for the character which makes Huck so much more relatable, and believable than what was written in the script.

Q:  How would you describe your directing style?

 

A: All consuming.  I push myself harder than anyone, but I also require a lot of my cast and crew.  Everyone on set needs to be fully invested in the project.  I like a laid back attitude when it suits the scene and I do make efforts to not burn people out, but when it comes down to it we are there to work.  Fortunately I had an amazing cast and crew who understood this and who spoke up when they had concerns.  I learned in the last two weeks of shooting not to burn the candle from both ends quite as much as I had before and I think began to get a healthier rhythm together, but in general after we wrap shooting I sleep the majority of the next few days because I’m so exhausted.

Q: What kind of day job (or income source) do you have and what impact did it have on the firm?

(shooting schedule, budget, etc.)

 

I freelance as an event photographer, videographer, editor, and sometimes producer/director for short documentaries.  I had a job setting up photo booths for parties.  In general my day job has me working with a camera in some capacity.  It definitely had an impact because I started with only enough financing for a week of shooting, then another week of shooting, then editing the proof of concept, pre-production on primary shooting, primary shooting and finally post-production, between each stage of production I was working to raise money for the next phase.  My budget limitations also forced me to streamline the script, to cut unnecessary scenes and to focus hard on what was most important, in the end I think this helped craft a tighter narrative.  Sometimes limitations can be a good thing.

 

  1. What is your funniest Hollywood story?

I don’t really know that I have one.  So far, I’ve been a filmmaker outside of the Hollywood system.  I spent 12 years making documentary films before I started working on Huckleberry.  We shot Huckleberry in rural Ohio and had only one rising star, Jahking Guillory, in the cast from LA.  I did do the sound mix for the proof of concept in LA with my sound mixer and good friend Dennis Schweitzer, during that week I was staying at Dennis’ apartment and sleeping on an air mattress that would deflate each night leaving laying in a heap on the floor.  It was far from glamorous but we got the job done.  Oh and Danny Devito was staying with us as well….Just kidding, I don’t know anyone famous.

  1. What are some of your favorite films and why?

 

I vacillate between really heavy dramas like First Reformed, which was incredible, and comedies like The Big LebowskiNo Country for Old Men was amazing and blends the environment seamlessly with the story.  I loved Winter’s Bone for that same reason.  I think my favorite films are ones that aren’t set in Hollywood (other than Lebowski) and that open the audience’s imaginations to life in a distinct part of the country or the world.  Those that integrate the social values of the community into the narrative of the film, and which leave the audience asking questions, and thinking about a theme or subject differently than when they entered the theater.  I think we accomplished this as well with our setting in the Rust Belt.  It’s an environment I’m very familiar with after growing up in Northeast Ohio.  Some of my favorite films leave me at first frustrated with endings that aren’t wrapped in tidy bows, but which cause reflection on the deeper meaning of the film, which may come shortly or even days after the experience.  My favorite films stick in my mind after I watch them and make me work to figure out the message of the filmmaker.

Q: How did you go about financing the film?

A: I’d say about half the financing came out of pocket, I also deferred my rate as director.  Friends and family donated about 25% of the budget and the rest came from Kickstarter and a lone investor, Zak Webb who is one of the Executive Producers on the film.  We shot a proof of concept for Huckleberry over a two week period in October and December of 2016, between shoots I was hustling, working holiday parties as an event photographer and videographer.  I was pretty confident the film wouldn’t get made on the strength of the script alone, especially with me being an unproven director, so the proof of concept was critical in the process.  Finally I saved enough to finish shooting over a two week period in August of 2017.  I also partnered with the Film Division at Ohio University, which was a huge resource and saved me a lot of money, while also providing a substantial amount of the crew members from current and past students of  the program.

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

An Interview with YouTuber Desiree Mitchell

DESIREE MITCHELL

Desiree Mitchell is a singer, YouTuber and actress; here is a link to her website:

 

https://www.officialdesiree.com/

 

 

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a professional entertainer?

 

A: I knew that I wanted to be an entertainer when I tried dance, acting, and vocal lessons from 5-8 years old. My mom put me in these classes for fun during the summers and I never wanted to leave. Performing was the best feeling in the world, so I knew at a very young age that my dream career was to be an entertainer.

 

 

Q: Who are some of your musical influences and how can we see this influence in your work?

 

A: I love Beyoncé, Drake, Rihanna, Aaliyah… just to name a few. These people all have influenced me in different ways, since they are so different from eachother.

Beyonce is the greatest performer of all time. She can do it all. I remember seeing her in concert for the first time when I was 8 years old and I was never the same! What she has accomplished as it relates to her career is unheard of. And as a young black woman, I’m so inspired. If Beyonce didn’t exist, I would be a much different artist today.

Drake, he’s just dope and such a trendsetter in music. Whether people want to admit it or not, Drake’s unique sound and flow has changed hip-hop and R&B as we know it. I truly feel that almost every rapper and R&B artist to come after him has been influenced by him in some way. He’s a legend, honestly.

Rihanna… what can’t she do?! She puts out an album, and every song is a hit. Every single time. She has dominated the music industry, the fashion industry, the makeup industry… I mean, wow. It’s crazy. That’s so inspiring. There’s been a lot of people in my life that have told me that I can’t do it all… that if I’m an artist and I try to come out with a makeup line as well, they won’t take me serious. And that I “have to pick one”. I’m so glad that Rihanna has broken that stigma. You can absolutely do it all.

Aaliyah – Rest In Peace baby girl. She was really one of a kind and I wish she were still here today to have gotten the chance to grow and reach her full potential. Her sound was beautiful. She was just so cool in so many ways. Her voice was so soothing. She was so confident. That’s inspiring. She has heavily influenced me and you can definitely hear it in my music.

I have taken so many things from the 4 people listed above and I definitely think that it’s obvious in my sound and overall artistry.

 

 

Q: What inspired your song, “I Need That?”

 

A: I wrote “I Need That” while going through a rough patch with the last guy I was in love with. We had a very on and off relationship. Communication wasn’t there. We’d sometimes stop talking for weeks or even months at a time. But when we were on good terms, it was amazing. You know? I kind of just wrote the song to show the ups and downs of our situation, but to also let him know that I forgive him. When you’re in love with someone, all you want is for it to work out. With him, I was much more forgiving that I’d ever thought I’d be. I’m happy that I’ve moved on and that I’m not in that place with him anymore, but I’d never bash him or diss him. The truth is, he taught me a lot. We were both entertainers. I had a good time. Although it didn’t work out, when I think back on our situation, I don’t regret it at all.

 

 

Q: What is your new series, “”Loyalty” about?

 

A: “Loyalty” is about a few young adults that are going through the struggles of everyday life and the choices that they make. It’s almost like the butterfly effect – every choice that you make in life has a huge consequence. Life is gritty. Within the urban community, there’s a lot of things that go on that nobody really talks about. I love the concept of this show because I feel like it’s realistic. The truth is, people do drugs. People sell drugs. People have affairs. People get killed. Yeah it’s not right, but it’s real. People go through things. Life is intense. I can’t wait for everyone to see it.

 

 

Q: What role do you play?

 

A: I wear a lot of hats in “Loyalty”. I am the writer, director, executive producer, and the lead character. It was an amazing experience and I’m so proud of myself and the rest of my team for pulling this off! My character’s name in the show is Desirée White. She’s dope. She’s nonjudgmental. She’s a good girl but she still goes through things and even makes bad choices along the way.

 

 

Q: How did you become involved with the project?

 

A: I started writing “Loyalty” about 2 and a half years ago. It took me a while to get it to the point that I felt it needed to be to start filming. This is the first TV project I’ve ever written, so I definitely wanted to take my time. Now that it’s filmed and in post-production, I can’t wait for everyone to see this magic.

 

 

Q: You also make YouTube videos and get lots of plays. How did you build your audience?

 

A: I started actually posting videos on YouTube a little under a year ago. I had a few friends that were already YouTubers and told me how great it was, so I started actually getting serious about it. I definitely feel that I have a unique brand on YouTube because I often talk about my music and acting life on there and my subscribers get to see vlogs of my life outside of YouTube.

 

Q: What kind of day job do you have and how does it effect your pursuit of your career?

 

A: I’ve never had a day job before. I’ve been pursuing my career in a serious way since I was about 11 years old. I have an amazing mother that believed in me from day one. My income currently comes from YouTube, Instagram Promo and Commercials.  I have over 400,000 followers/subscribers on my social media platforms which allows me to capitalize on my influence.

 

 

Q: What is your strangest on set story?

 

A: Hmmm. Strangest on set story? I guess I would say that I have been apart of projects that I’ve been on set for hours for, but the project never came out. Haha! I mean, it’s the life of an actress. Sometimes that happens. No complaints over here.

 

 

Q: What are some of your favorite gangster movies or TV shows?

 

A: Gangster movies and shows? Hmmm. It depends on what is considered “gangster”.My show “Loyalty” was ver y inspired by the show “Power” on STARZ. I love gritty shows like that. Like I mentioned before, life is gritty. I love real life kind of shows. I also fell in love with the show “Narcos” on Netflix. I love the iconic movie “Set It Off” with that AMAZING female cast. As far as comedies go, I love the move “Friday”… it’s still real life, it’s just funny at the same time!

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

An Interview With Actor Alessandro Marino

AleMarino (3)

 

Alessandro Marino is an actor who appears in the new series, “Manny’s Garage Sale”; here is a link to his website:

https://www.alessandromarino.net/

 

Q: When did you know you were an actor?

 

A: The moment I knew I was an actor was after a scene study class in which I did for the first time a scene from “A Hatful of Rain”, a play by Michael V. Gazzo in which I played “Polo”. That night I came back home and I couldn’t sleep, I kept writing and day dreaming and working on the script all night, I just couldn’t wait to do that again. I was incredibly excited but also very scared, I knew that was going to change everything.

 

Q: Your website says you like classic films. What classic film role could you have nailed and why?

 

A: It’s hard to think about nailing a part in a classic movie when they were already nailed by legend like Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, Paul Newman, Humphrey Bogart and so on.. but I can definitely tell you two roles, one in an american classic and one in an italian classic, that I would have loved to play: E. Lee Prewitt in “From Here to Eternity” by Zinnemann and Guido in “8 ½” by Fellini. Two very different roles but both very magical for me. “8 ½” taught me how there’s no right or wrong in art as long as you express yourself truthfully. A great lesson for me.

 

Q: What is Manny’s Garage Sale about?

 

A: Manny is the proprietor of a regular garage sale where common items ignite uncommon events. Kind-hearted and just “a little left of center” Manny has a way of knowing exactly what a customer needs…even before they do. Manny’s Garage Sale is a quirky look at everyone’s relationship with their own wishes, dreams and goals. No matter what your religious or spiritual beliefs one thing is certain – we all impact one another. We can only hope that it’s for the better of all involved.

Good answer ah?;) I wish I could write english so well! This above is the description you can find on www.mannysgaragesale.com . Go check it out!

 

 

Q: What role do you play?

 

A: I play the role of Frank. Full name Frank N. Stein. If you read it all at once you can immediately have a quick idea of how hard life has been for Frank since a very young age… He’s an italian-american young man in his twenties living in USA and trying to make it as a writer while working at the cafeteria to support himself. Just when life seems to be too hard on him and he starts to lose hope, something very magical happens… He’s very

 

 

Q: How would you describe Josh’s directing style?

 

A: I would describe his directing style as modern, free and fast. I was very impressed by the fact that he was able to film 3 different episodes simultaneously while keeping everything under control and having the ability to make strong directing choices in a nutshell. Being an actor himself he has the quality to be able to talk to actors, understand their process and leave them free to experiment and improvise. Josh has the great quality to transform every problem that arises on set into an opportunity to create something. His calm and good attitude even in anxious moments taught me a lot.

 

Q: How do you support yourself while pursuing your acting career?

 

A: Being a foreign actor I do not have the possibility to have a side job that is not related to the field I graduated in at the moment, so apart from the income I get from my acting and modeling career I heavily rely on a trust fund I was lucky to build when I was in Italy. I graduated in “Business & Management” back in Italy and worked there for a little while.

 

Q: What do you miss about Italy?

 

A: The food, the language and the beaches (I come from south of Italy) are for sure at the top of the list. However the single thing I miss the most is the sunday’s lunches at my grandfather’s house, when the whole family get together. It’s not easy to be the only one missing!

 

 

Q: What is your strangest Los Angeles story?

 

A: It was one of the first nights out since I moved to Los Angeles, I was in a very nice bar in West Hollywood and I was talking with this beautiful girl and I asked her if she wanted a drink. She asks for champagne, which is not the best answer you can get as a struggling actor, but she was too beautiful and smart to say no. So while thinking how to save those money in the next days I decide to go to the bar and get two glasses of champagne.

The time to coming back and bam… she was talking in the corner with another guy, drinking champagne. I couldn’t believe that, until I realized that the guy she was talking to was Leonardo Di Caprio. That made me quickly understand that the competition in any field here in Los Angeles is not like in South of Italy! It was the last time I went to get two drinks at a bar without bringing the lady with me!!

 

 

Q: What kind of training have you had?

 

A: I started studying acting at the City Academy of London, then studied at Michael Rodger’s Acting Studio in Milan, graduated in Acting for Film at NYFA in Los Angeles last september and currently studying Meisner Technique at The Sanford Meisner Center for the Arts in North Hollywood.

 

 

Q: What would you do if you disagreed with a director about how a role should be played?

 

A: I would definitely try to talk to him and explain my reasons and listen to his, but in the case the disagreement can not be solved I would trust him and adapt.  An actor should always show up on set with clear and strong choices about the character but it’s the director who has a vision of the bigger picture and an actor should trust his vision and be able to adapt truthfully to any situations and change.

(As long as the director is not drunk… :p)

 

Eliza’s interviews are done by email; all answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects:)

An Interview With Actor Clay Cureton

clay

 

 

Clay Cureton is an actor who appears in the short film, All In; here is a link to his Facebook page:

 

https://www.facebook.com/claycali

Q: What made you interested in acting?

 

A: I’d have to give my oldest sister Anita the credit for my passion for acting because it was she who as a theater/drama club member in high school would write 2 part plays that would of course star me and her. By the way she was about 16 and I was about 6.

 

Q: What is, All In about?

 

A: ALL IN is a short film about William and 3 of his friends who go through college together running a 4 person poker card team. Anyway after college they go their separate ways and unbeknownst to the other 3 William becomes an FBI agent who’s current case tasks him to bring down a traveling casino den that is using and laundering counterfeit money. Hence the reason William gets the gang back together…

 

Q: What role do you play?

 

A:  I play the lead Agent William.

 

Q: How did you prepare for the role?

 

A:  You know its funny in preparing for any role I always read any directionals that come with the script as well as asking the writer or director what their vision for the character might be and then I usually watch any movies that I think might be closely related to the role I’m playing. For ALL IN I watched the movies 21 and Now You See Me part 1.

 

Q:  You minored in theater in college. What are some of the differences between stage acting and screen acting?

 

A: I think some glaring differences is on stage/in theatre you play to the audience, the energy is more in your face because you know that if you make a mistake the audience is right there to catch it so your focus hyper heightened. Also in my experience I found theater directors/writers to be more in your face. As opposed to screen acting where you’re playing to and off your co star/s and camera. I also think you have to channel create and bring your own energy to any character/s roles you play…

 

Q: What kind of day job (or income source) do you have and how does it influence your acting?

 

A:  I am a property manager by trade and have been for about 12 years and for me my day job helps my acting by allowing to interact with different personalities which helps me hone my abilities to play off of people as well as create and develop my own character roles based on the various people I meet…

 

Q: What is your strangest Los Angeles story?

 

A: Wow, what is my strangest LA story? That’s tough… I’ll go with this one around 2010 I was in Pasadena attending a manager’s conference and it was running extremely long and I was extremely hungry. So we finally get a break so I run across the street to so I think Baja Fresh (maybe) and I get inside and its packed I mean no available seats. So finally I order and get my food and I spot a free table outside. So I race to the table get the spot only to realize I didn’t get a drink so I place my tray of food on the table and head back inside to grab a beverage. It takes maybe 10 minutes I get my drink and race back to my table only to find someone seated at my table eating my food. At that moment in my mind I had 2 choices: #1 I could get angry and cause a scene or #2 I could realize that the man probably needed the food far more than I did. I’m proud to say I chose option 2 and I thought he she have a drink with his meal so I gave him the drink as well…

 

Q: What famous theatrical role would you like to attempt?

 

A: That’s an easy one, Othello, in Othello or even Iago because I had about a year of Shakespearian training in college but I have yet to have a chance to use it. I’d just like to see what and how I’d do with the role…

 

Q:  To what method of acting do you ascribe?

 

A: You know its funny because I used to think I was more Meisner mostly because at San Diego State my professor/s mostly taught the Meisner technique. However, I realize now my style is definitely more Lee Strasberg because the first thing I look to do is find an emotional connection with a role and then I try to apply the writer’s vision of the role to my personal life. I’ve found that I’m far more authentic this way…

 

Q:  Your movie is about gambling. What movie would you bet on to win, best picture this year?

 

A:  I’m betting All the Money In the World the movie by Ridley Scott about J Paul Getty starring Christopher Plummer and Mark Wahlberg

 

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.

An Interview With Actress Caroline DeGraeve

car (1)

(Originally posted to ActLand.)

 

 

Caroline DeGraeve is an actress who appears in Josh Mitchell’s new film Hard Visit; here is a link to her website:

 

Q: What made you interested in working in film?

 

A: Last summer I was cast as the lead role of Beth Clark, for a western indie film called Cataract Gold (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnxviqZhW_Q).

I had no prior experience as an actor but the director, Paul Kiener, insisted I was natural. Upon my first day of filming, I felt I was meant to be in film. I was simultaneously at ease and excited. I knew I wanted to work in film immediately.

 

Q: What is Hard Visit about?

 

A: Hard Visit is about a struggling actor, Ben, who goes to his bookie brother, Smoothy, for help. Ben gets thrown into the shady world of gambling, deception and hidden agendas. When a conniving woman gets between the two brothers, the stakes run higher than ever.

 

Q: What role do you play in the film?

 

A: I play Piper Kissinger, a woman after Smoothy’s attentions in

the hot tub.

 

Q: How did you prepare for the role?

 

A: I put myself in the shoes of someone who seduces a man for personal gain.

 

Q: What is your strangest audition story?

 

A: When I was approached for the lead in Cataract Gold, I wasn’t even aware of auditions taking place. I was at a Starbuck’s waiting for my drink. I had just finished a hike in 100 degree weather. I must’ve looked a fright! I remember being frustrated that my phone wasn’t connecting to Wi-Fi fast enough and was probably scowling. In my periphery, I noticed someone staring at me and I was not in the mood for shenanigans, so I looked up, gave my best glare, and continued being preoccupied with my phone. The man staring turned out to be Paul Kiener, who proceeded to tell me he was casting for his western and that he loved my look. I wasn’t swayed to participate because I had no clue who he was and it just seemed odd to approach a stranger in line for coffee to audition for a lead role in a feature film. I did, however, take his card. After a few hours of searching online for any telltale signs of smut films under his name or any other shady work, and not finding anything, I gave him a call. I met him an hour later and read a few pages of the script for him. Next, he asked if I could ride a horse without falling off. I answered “yes”. Next thing I knew, I was in a movie. It was all very surreal, but I loved every moment of the experience and I knew I wanted more.

 

Q: How does your work as a bartender influence your pursuit of acting?

 

A: I act every day of my life. Bartending or serving is like putting on a show. You greet the guests differently based on what you read about their expression or behavior. In the hospitality industry, it’s important to learn how to talk to all sorts of people. You can’t be afraid to engage in conversation or draw their attention in some way. As a bartender, the bar is your ship, so to speak, and you are the captain. You have to read your crew, anticipate their needs, and know if someone is getting unruly or causing disharmony. Moreover, you should know how to approach each situation based on how you read each individual, or if any personal dynamics amongst your guests exist. If your assessment of any given scenario is correct, you will be able to slide right into any character you need to get the result you want. My personal thoughts or feelings are on the backburner while I work. It’s all an act.

 

Q:  Have you ever been offered a gig while you were tending bar?

 

A: Nothing of consequence ever came of several conversations. It’s a common occurrence for people to show interest in film or suggest working together on something.

 

Q:  What do you like about living in the desert?

 

A: Contrary to what many people think, I love the heat! Also, it’s a very relaxed lifestyle that has enough activity to involve yourself with, if you so choose. Also, there is a lot of talent in the desert. I filmed my short film, Real Smile (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6043410/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1) in the desert and had a lot of help from businesses and other artists in completing it.

 

Q: With which character that you have played do you have the least in common?

 

A: The role of Dolly in Gina Carey’s The One Year Pact (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt7079604/) is very different from me. Dolly is a very vulnerable, dependent woman. In the scene, Dolly is embarrassed and in tears at something that happens and locks herself away to hide. I’m not a crybaby, nor would I lend much importance a situation that blemished a flawless reputation for propriety. I’m not interested in being seen as perfect. I believe our flaws give us the human connection we crave.

 

Q: Do you think aspiring artist are more susceptible to con men such as bookies and hustlers?

 

A: Yes. Aspiring to amount to anything in the entertainment world demands a lot of work and effort for almost no return. It takes guts and tenacity to keep at it. There will be pitfalls and disappointments but, in the end, it’s about how much you want it. Being confident, being a hard worker, and developing a marketing strategy are tools that will inch you along despite setbacks.

 

 

Please note; Eliza’s interviews are done by email. All answers are unedited and come right from the lovely fingertips of her subjects.